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Atomic Scale Characterization of (NH4)2Sx-Treated GaAs (100) Surface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

Naoki Yokoi
Affiliation:
Faculty of Engineering Science and Research Center for Extreme Materials, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560, Japan
Hiroya Andoh
Affiliation:
Faculty of Engineering Science and Research Center for Extreme Materials, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560, Japan
Mikio Takai
Affiliation:
Faculty of Engineering Science and Research Center for Extreme Materials, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560, Japan
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Abstract

The geometric structure of GaAs (100) surfaces, treated in a (NH4)2Sx solution and annealed in N2 environment, has been studied in an atomic scale using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering (RBS), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). RBS analysis using medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) could provide the thickness of the sulfur layer on the GaAs surface of about 1.5 monolayers. RBS channeling spectra indicated that the disorder of atoms in the surface region of S-terminated samples was smaller than that of untreated one. XPS spectra showed that S atoms on the surface bonded only As atoms. STM observation revealed that S atoms had a periodicity of 4 Å corresponding to that of Ga or As atoms in the (100) plane.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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