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Acoustic Properties of Organic/Inorganic Composite Aerogels

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Winny Dong
Affiliation:
winnydong@csupomona.edu, California Polytechnic University, Chemical and Materials Engineering, Pomona, California, United States
Tanya Faltens
Affiliation:
Tanya_Faltens@fakemail.com, California Polytechnic University, Chemical and Materials Engineering, Pomona, California, United States
Michael Pantell
Affiliation:
Michael_Pantell@fakemail.com, California Polytechnic University, Physics, Pomona, California, United States
Diana Simon
Affiliation:
Diana_Simon@fakemail.com, California Polytechnic University, Industrial Chemistry, Pomona, California, United States
Travis Thompson
Affiliation:
Travis_Thompson@fakemail.com, California Polytechnic University, Mechanical Engineering, Pomona, California, United States
Wayland Dong
Affiliation:
WaylandDon@fakemail.com, Veneklasen Associates, Santa Monica, California, United States
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Abstract

Composite aerogels (with varying concentrations of silica and poly-dimethylsiloxane) were developed and their acoustic absorption coefficient as a function of composition and average pores size have been measured. The polydimethylsiloxane modified the ceramic structure of the silica aerogels, decreasing the material’s rigidity while maintaining the high porosity of the aerogel structure. The composite aerogels were found to exhibit different modes of acoustic absorption than that of typical porous absorbers such as fiberglass. At some frequencies, the composite aerogels had 40% higher absorption than that of commercial fiberglass. Physical data show that these materials have a large surface area (> 400 m2/g) and varying pore sizes (d ˜ 5 - 20 nm).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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