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Low-voltage organic transistor with subfemtoliter inkjet source–drain contacts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 June 2011

Tomoyuki Yokota
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Department of Applied Physics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
Tsuyoshi Sekitani
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Department of Applied Physics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
Yu Kato
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Department of Applied Physics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
Kazunori Kuribara
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Department of Applied Physics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
Ute Zschieschang
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Hagen Klauk
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Tatsuya Yamamoto
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan
Kazuo Takimiya
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan
Hirokazu Kuwabara
Affiliation:
Nippon Kayaku Co., Ltd., Kita-ku, Tokyo 123-0865, Japan
Masaaki Ikeda
Affiliation:
Nippon Kayaku Co., Ltd., Kita-ku, Tokyo 123-0865, Japan
Takao Someya
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Department of Applied Physics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan; Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics (INQIE), The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan
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Abstract

We have successfully achieved a transconductance of 0.76 S/m for organic thin-film transistors with 4 V operation, which is the largest value reported for organic transistors fabricated using printing methods. Using a subfemtoliter inkjet, silver electrodes with a line width of 1 µm and a channel length of 1 µm were printed directly onto an air-stable, high-mobility organic semiconductor that was deposited on a single-molecule self-assembled monolayer-based gate dielectric. On reducing the droplet volume (0.5 fl) ejected from the inkjet nozzle, which reduces sintering temperatures down to 90 °C, the inkjet printing of silver electrodes was accomplished without damage to the organic semiconductor.

Type
Rapid Communications
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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References

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Yokota Supplementary Figure S1

Figure S1. Optical microscopy image of the organic thin-film transistors with patterned Al gates, ultrathin AlOx/SAM gate dielectric, vacuum-deposited DNTT as the semiconductor, and subfemtoliter inkjet-printed Ag nanoparticle source/drain contacts. The channel length is 1 µm.

Image 69 KB

Yokota Supplementary Figure S2

Figure S2. Electrical characteristics of DNTT TFTs with channel lengths of 1 µm (VDS = -4 V) (a) Drain current as a function of gate-source voltage (b) Square root of drain current as a function of gate-source voltage.

Image 60 KB

Yokota Supplementary Figures Legend

Yokota Supplementary Figures Legend

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