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Sustainable development and physical infrastructure materials

  • Robert Heard (a1), Chris Hendrickson (a2) and Francis C. McMichael (a3)

Abstract

Physical infrastructure, including buildings, roads, pipelines, bridges, power lines, communications networks, canals, and waterways, make up a substantial fraction of worldwide material usage and flows. Consequently, the overall mass of materials and the associated environmental impacts must be addressed to achieve sustainable development of infrastructure. This article surveys the magnitude of material use for infrastructure, including trends in the use per person, environmental impacts of the production and use of infrastructure materials, variations in the longevity of physical infrastructure, and changes in the recycling of infrastructure materials.

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References

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Sustainable development and physical infrastructure materials

  • Robert Heard (a1), Chris Hendrickson (a2) and Francis C. McMichael (a3)

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