Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Article contents

Advanced Inorganic Materials for Photovoltaics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Abstract

By 2050, world annual energy consumption is predicted to grow from the present 13 terawatt - years (TWyr) to nearly 30 TWyr. Although all energy sources must be considered in meeting this challenge, solar energy may arguably be the only carbon-free source capable of supplying a significant fraction of energy at these levels. This issue of MRS Bulletin reviews the status and future development of solar photovoltaic technologies based on inorganic materials. The discussion begins with materials and cell designs for second-generation photovoltaics based on thin films [a-Si:H, Si, Cu(In, Ga)(Se, S)2, CdTe]. Recent advances in tandem cells and concentrators are alsoreported, along with photovoltaic approaches involving nanoscale materials such as quantum dot arrays. Finally, work on transparent conducting oxides that are critical to nearly all cell designs are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

References

1.Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization: Report on the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization, April 18–21, 2005 (Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy, 2005).Google Scholar
2.Nuclear Energy Data, Edition 2006 (OECD Publishing, Paris, 2006).Google Scholar
3. The Solarbuzz Web site at www.solarbuzz.com maintains up-to-date photovoltaic panel and power cost information.Google Scholar
4.Maycock, P.D., PV News 24 (3) (March 2005).Google Scholar
5.Our Solar Power Future: The U.S. Photovoltaics Industry Roadmap through 2030 and Beyond (SEIA, Washington, DC, 2004).Google Scholar
6. Energy for the Future: Renewable Sources of Energy, White Paper for a Community Strategy and Action Plan (European Commission, 1997).Google Scholar
7.Green Paper: Towards a European Strategy for the Security of Energy Supply (European Commission, 2000).Google Scholar
8.Advanced Energy Initiative (White House National Economic Council, February 2006).Google Scholar
9.Surek, T., J. Cryst. Growth 275 (2005) p. 292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10.Green, M.A., in Proc. 15th Int. Photovoltaic Sci. & Eng. Conf. (PVSEC-15) (Shanghai, October 10–15, 2005) p. 7.Google Scholar
11.MRS Bull. 30 (1) (2005).Google Scholar
12.Green, M.A., High-Efficiency Silicon Solar Cells (Trans Tech, Aedermannsdorf, Switzerland, 1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13.Shockley, W. and Queisser, H.J., J. Appl. Phys. 32 (1961) p. 510.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14.Green, M.A., Emery, K., King, D.L., Hisikawa, Y., and Warta, W., Prog. Photovoltaics: Res. Appl. 15 (2007) p. 35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15.Swanson, R.M., Prog. Photovoltaics: Res. Appl. 14 (2006) p. 443.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 364 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 16th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access
Hostname: page-component-77fc7d77f9-n279q Total loading time: 0.319 Render date: 2021-01-16T10:10:26.165Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "1", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Sat Jan 16 2021 09:53:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": true, "languageSwitch": true, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Advanced Inorganic Materials for Photovoltaics
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Advanced Inorganic Materials for Photovoltaics
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Advanced Inorganic Materials for Photovoltaics
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *