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Super-Critical-CO2 De-ECM Process

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 June 2018

Diana Cho
Affiliation:
Center for Printable Materials Certification, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA
Seungwon Chung
Affiliation:
Materials and Biomedical Engineering Department, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA
Jaeseok Eo
Affiliation:
Materials and Biomedical Engineering Department, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA
Namsoo P. Kim
Affiliation:
Center for Printable Materials Certification, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA Materials and Biomedical Engineering Department, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA
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Abstract

Extracellular Matrix (ECM), a natural biomaterials, have recently garnered attention in tissue engineering for their high degree of cell proliferative capacity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and tenability in the body. Decellularization process offers a unique approach for fabricating ECM-based natural scaffold for tissue engineering application by removing intracellular contents in a tissue that could cause any adverse host responses. The effects of Supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO2) treatment on the histological and biochemical properties of the decellularized extracellular matrix (de-ECM) were evaluated and compared with de-ECM from conventional decellularization process to see if it offers significantly reduced treatment times, complete decellularization, and well preserved extracellular matrix structure. The study has shown that a novel method of using supercritical fluid extraction system indeed removed all unnecessary residues and only leaving ECM. The potential of Sc-CO2 de-ECM progressed as a promising approach in tissue repair and regeneration.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2018 

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