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Greenhouse Effect in Photovoltaic Cells to Enhance Efficiency of Power Beam Conversion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 January 2019

Andrei Sergeev*
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783, USA
Andrew Hewitt
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783, USA
Harry Hier
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783, USA
C. Mike Waits
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783, USA
Myles A. Steiner
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, USA
Kimberly Sablon
Affiliation:
Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, Arlington, VA, USA
*Corresponding
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Abstract

Recent progress in semiconductor materials with minor nonradiative recombination has stimulated investigations of novel photovoltaic (PV) converters with optical control of radiative emission. Angle restricted emission was experimentally demonstrated in PV devices with external photon recycling due to specific photonic crystals or mirrors. In this work we investigate the power beam conversion by the cell with front “greenhouse” filter, which transmits the laser light, but recycles the low energy bandgap quanta emitted by the semiconductor cell. We calculate the limiting characteristics of the greenhouse PV converters and optimize design of the converter taking into account the nonradiative recombination processes. In optimized devices addition of the greenhouse filter can increase power beam conversion efficiency by several percent.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2018 

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