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Fluidic and Electronic Transport in Silicon Nanotube Biosensors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2016

Nicolas Hibst
Affiliation:
Institute of Electron Devices and Circuits, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 45, D-89081 Ulm, Germany
Annina M. Steinbach
Affiliation:
Institute of Electron Devices and Circuits, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 45, D-89081 Ulm, Germany
Steffen Strehle*
Affiliation:
Institute of Electron Devices and Circuits, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 45, D-89081 Ulm, Germany
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Abstract

Silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) represent unique building blocks for future nanoscale biosensor devices merging electronic sensing and nanofluidics. Configured as ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs), SiNTs have great potential for charge sensing or label-free chemical detection in minute sample volumes flowing through their inner cavity. In the present study, doped SiNTs were synthesized from the gas phase in a bottom-up approach. To study their nanofluidic and electronic transport properties, single SiNTs were functionally integrated as ISFETs and coupled to a microfluidic system. The experimental results for ion diffusion through a SiNT are in full agreement with numerical calculations based on Fick's second law if a diffusion coefficient is assumed approximately one order of magnitude smaller than the bulk value.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2016 

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References

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