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Noonkanbahite, BaKNaTi2(Si4O12)O2, a new mineral species: description and crystal structure

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2018

Y. A. Uvarova
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 Canada
E. Sokolova
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 Canada
F. C. Hawthorne
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 Canada
R. P. Liferovich
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 Canada
R. H. Mitchell
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 Canada
I. V. Pekov
Affiliation:
Department of Mineralogy, Faculty of Geology, Moscow State University, Vorob'evy Gory, Moscow, Russia 119992
A. E. Zadov
Affiliation:
NPP Teplokhim, Dmitrovskoye av. 71, Moscow, Russia 127238
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Noonkanbahite, ideally BaKNaTi2(Si4O12)O2, is described as a new mineral species. At Liley [Löhley], Eifel Mountains, Germany (the holotype locality), it occurs as sprays of prismatic crystals (up to 8 mm) or single prismatic crystals (up to 4 mm) on walls of cavities in alkaline igneous rocks. At Murun, Siberia, Russia, noonkanbahite forms coarse lamellar crystals up to 0.05 cm × 0.7 cm × 1.5 cm embedded in kalsilite syenite. Noonkanbahite is brittle, H = 6, D obs. = 3.39(1), D calc. = 3.49 g/cm3, has a vitreous lustre and does not fluoresce in ultraviolet light. It has poor cleavage on {010} and {100} and weak parting on {011}. Noonkanbahite is biaxial positive with 2Vobs. = 75(2)°, 2Vcalc. = 72.7(9)°, α 1.730(5), β 1.740(5) and γ 1.765(5), dispersion is medium, r < v. In transmitted plane-polarized light, noonkanbahite is strongly pleochroic, with X colourless, Y yellowish, Z straw-yellow; X = a, Y = b, Z = c. Noonkanbahite is orthorhombic, space group Imma, a = 8.0884(4), b = 10.4970(5), c = 13.9372(6) Å, V = 1183.3(1) Å3, Z = 4. The strongest ten X-ray diffraction lines in the powder pattern [d in Å (I)(hkl)] are: 2.907(100)(222), 8.353(50)(001), 3.196(50)(220), 2.097(50)(242), 2.241(40)(215), 2.179(40)(035), 3.377(30)(031), 2.694(30)(015), 2.304(30)(233), and 1.564(30)(064). Electron microprobe analysis gives SiO2 37.82, TiO2 15.54, ZrO2 0.42, Nb2O5 3.18, Al2O3 0.17, Fe2O3 (recalculated from FeO) 5.63, MnO 0.32, MgO 0.53, BaO 20.60, CaO 1.36, K2O 5.32, Na2O 6.14, F 0.78, H2O 0.58, sum 98.39 wt.%, (H2O determined by SIMS). The formula unit, calculated on the basis of 14 anions (O+OH+F), is (Ba0.85K0.13)Σ 0.98(K0.59Na0.26Ca0.15)Σ1.00Na(Ti1.23Fe0.45 3+Nb0.15Mg0.08Mn0.03Zr0.02Al0.01)Σ 1.97 (Si3.99Al0.01O12)(O1.33OH0.41F0.26)Σ 2.00, Z = 4.

The crystal structure was refined to R 1 = 2.8% for 970 unique (F 0 > 4σF) reflections collected on a Bruker single-crystal P4 diffractometer with a CCD detector and Mo Kα X-radiation. The crystal structure of noonkanbahite is isostructural with that of batisite, ideally BaNa2Ti2(Si4O12)O2, and scherbakovite, ideally K2NaTi2(Si4O12)O(OH). There are two octahedrally coordinated sites, M(1) and M(2), occupied by (Ti1.23Fe0.45 3+Nb0.15Mg0.08Mn0.03Zr0.02Al0.01), ideally Ti2 a.p.f.u. There are three interstitial A sites, [9] A(1), [8] A(2) and [6] A(3), occupied by Ba, K and Na, respectively. Si tetrahedra and M octahedra form a framework with interstitial cages occupied by Ba, K and Na atoms at the A sites. Noonkanbahite, BaKNaTi2(Si4O12)O2, is a K analogue of batisite, BaNa2Ti2(Si4O12)O2, and a Ba analogue of shcherbakovite, K2NaTi2(Si4O12)O(OH).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2010

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Uvarova et al. supplementary material

Refinement data

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Uvarova et al. supplementary material

Structure factor data

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