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Suitability of PLLA as Piezoelectric Substrates for Tissue Engineering Evidenced by Microscopy Techniques

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 September 2012

N. B. Barroca
Affiliation:
CICECO, Dep. of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
A. L. Daniel-da-Silva
Affiliation:
CICECO, Dep. of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
P. S. Gomes
Affiliation:
Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Porto, 4200-393 Porto, Portugal
M. H. R. Fernandes
Affiliation:
Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Porto, 4200-393 Porto, Portugal
S. Lanceros-Méndez
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057, Braga, Portugal
P. Sharma
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 202 Ferguson Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111, USA
A. Gruverman
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 202 Ferguson Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111, USA
M. H. V. Fernandes
Affiliation:
CICECO, Dep. of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
P. M.Vilarinho
Affiliation:
CICECO, Dep. of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
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Abstract

Since the discovery of the piezoelectric character of bone, the suitability of some piezoelectric materials have been studied for bone repair; they are thought to act like transducers converting the mechanical energy of skeletal deformation in electrical stimuli capable of controlling osteogenic growth. The mechanisms underlying this process are far from being understood and systematic studies at a local scale are required. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a unique way to observe phenomena at the nanoscale and liquid imaging provides a unique tool to assess biological phenomena at the nanoscale. So in this study, aiming at a better understanding of the role of piezoelectricity in the osteogenic growth, the interaction between a poled piezoelectric material, in this case poly (L-lactic) acid and an adhesion promoting protein, the fibronectin, and bone-like cells is evaluated by scanning probe microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM).

Type
Life Sciences
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2012

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