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Computation with classical sequents

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2008

STEFFEN VAN BAKEL
Affiliation:
Department of Computing, Imperial College London, 180 Queen's Gate London SW7 2BZ, U.K. Email: svb@doc.ic.ac.uk
PIERRE LESCANNE
Affiliation:
École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d'Italie 69364 Lyon 07, France Email: Pierre.Lescanne@ens-lyon.fr
Corresponding

Abstract

is an untyped continuation-style formal language with a typed subset that provides a Curry–Howard isomorphism for a sequent calculus for implicative classical logic. can also be viewed as a language for describing nets by composition of basic components connected by wires. These features make an expressive platform on which many different (applicative) programming paradigms can be mapped. In this paper we will present the syntax and reduction rules for ; in order to demonstrate its expressive power, we will show how elaborate calculi can be embedded, such as the λ-calculus, Bloo and Rose's calculus of explicit substitutions λx, Parigot's λμ and Curien and Herbelin's .

was first presented in Lengrand (2003), where it was called the λξ-calculus. It can be seen as the pure untyped computational content of the reduction system for the implicative classical sequent calculus of Urban (2000).

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Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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