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Anamorphoscopes another look at circle inverting mirrors

  • John Sharp (a1), B. G. Nickel (a2) and J. L. Hunt (a2)

Extract

In 1979 Philip W. Kuchel published a paper [1] in the Mathematical Gazette on using curved mirrors as a means of demonstrating the transformation known as inversion in a circle. He called the mirrors ‘anamorphoscopes’ since he came to the idea as a special case of the conical mirror anamorphosis which was a popular optical toy from the seventeenth century onwards [2]. In this paper we revisit his ideas with current technology and provide some extensions to Kuchel's derivation.

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References

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1. Kuchel, Philip W., Anamorphoscopes: a visual aid for circle inversion, Math. Gaz. 63 (June 1979), pp. 8289.
2. Baltrušaitis, Jurgis (translated by Strachan, W. J.), Anamorphic Art, Abrams, New York (1977).
3. Hunt, J. L., Nickel, B. G., Gigault, Christian, Anamorphic Images, Amer. Journal of Physics 68 (2000) pp. 232237.
4. Cargo, Gerald T., Graver, Jack E., Troutman, John L., Designing a mirror that inverts in a circle, Mathematical Intelligencer, 24, pp. 48.
5. Abramowitz, and Stegun, , Handbook of Mathematical Functions Dover, New York (1970).
6. Kempe, A. B., How to draw a straight line: A lecture on Linkages, London (1877).
7. POV-Ray is available from www.povray.org

Anamorphoscopes another look at circle inverting mirrors

  • John Sharp (a1), B. G. Nickel (a2) and J. L. Hunt (a2)

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