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Physical constraints at design of a high current inductor

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 July 2014

A.V. Kharlov
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
B.M. Kovalchuk
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
E.V. Kumpyak
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
G.V. Smorudov
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
N.V. Tsoy
Affiliation:
Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

High voltage, high current inductors are required for many high pulsed power systems, incorporating capacitor banks. Those inductors simultaneously serve both as a pulse shaping and protection element in R-L-C circuits. A 25 kV/70 kA protection inductor on inductance of 1 mH with low stray field was designed, manufactured, and tested. It was designed as a quasi-toroidal system, consisting of four coils (with 0.25 mH inductance each) evenly distributed in the perimeter of a square. The structure of coils was optimized to withstand a huge electromagnetic force produced by a 70 kA current. The 0.25 mH coil is made as multi-layer solenoid (six layers) from a copper wire (6 × 4 mm2 net cross-section) with fiberglass insulation. Layers are connected in parallel in order to decrease active resistance of the coil. This 0.25 mH coil was tested at 70 kA peak current with a pulse length of about 20 ms, which corresponds to the action integral at about 32 × 106 A2s. Maximum magnetic field inside the coil is about 12 T. A finite element analysis with the ELCUT software was used to calculate the magnetic field, temperature rise, and stresses in the protection inductor. The typical maximum stresses in our design are 100 MPa in copper coils and 140 MPa in fiberglass body tubes; these are both below the yield strength for these materials. Simulations results are compared with the experimental tests and good agreement is observed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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