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Femtosecond laser induced forward transfer of indium thin films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 November 2013

John Thomas
Affiliation:
Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal, India
Rodney Bernard
Affiliation:
Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal, India
John T. Thomas
Affiliation:
Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal, India
Kamlesh Alti*
Affiliation:
Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal, India
Santhosh Chidangil
Affiliation:
Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal, India
Satchi Kumari
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati, India
Alika Khare
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati, India
Deepak Mathur
Affiliation:
Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai, India
*
Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Kamlesh Alti, Department of Physics, Sant Gadge Baba Amravati University, Amravati-444602, India. E-mail: kamleshalti@sgbau.ac.in

Abstract

We report utilization of the laser induced forward transfer technique to re-deposit indium thin films onto the accepter substrate using nJ laser pulses from a femtosecond laser oscillator. Keeping the accepter substrate stationary enables dots of Indium to be deposited; in contrast, linear motion of the accepter substrate facilitates deposition of lines of Indium. The effect of laser pulse energy on the deposition process is studied. The effect of translation speed of donor substrate on the laser induced forward transfer pattern is also probed and an upper limit of translation speed is established beyond which smearing is observed to occur.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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References

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