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Diglossia: A bibliographic review1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2008

Alan Hudson
Affiliation:
Department of Linguistics, University of New MexicoAlbuquerque, NM 87131-1196

Abstract

The bibliography following the body of this paper contains a total of 1,092 entries on the subject of diglossia. Entries dealing with diglossia in the classical sense of Ferguson (1959) and in the sense of functional compartmentalization of distinct languages are represented approximately equally. Scholarly publication in the area of diglossia continues unabated as indicated by the fact that approximately one-half of the entries in the bibliography were published between 1983 and 1992. However, there remains a need for a comprehensive integration, comparative analysis, and socioevolutionary interpretation of diglossia research. (Bilingualism, diglossia, functional variation, literary languages, registers, standard languages, standardization)

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Articles
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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1992

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