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Petroleum compounds in the marine food web: short-term experiments on the fate of naphthalene in Calanus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2009

E. D. S. Corner
Affiliation:
The Laboratory, Marine Biological Association, Citadel Hill, Plymouth
R. P. Harris
Affiliation:
The Laboratory, Marine Biological Association, Citadel Hill, Plymouth
C. C. Kilvington
Affiliation:
The Laboratory, Marine Biological Association, Citadel Hill, Plymouth
S. C. M. O'Hara
Affiliation:
The Laboratory, Marine Biological Association, Citadel Hill, Plymouth

Abstract

Adult female Calanus helgolandicus Claus immersed for 24 h in sea-water solutions of [1-14C]naphthalene accumulated a detectable quantity (3.6 pg/animal) from concentrations as low as 0.10 μg/1.

Feeding experiments using barnacle nauplii or diatoms as foods showed that the dietary route of entry was more important quantitatively than direct uptake from solution in that in order to ensure that the same quantity of radioactivity in the animals was attained by the two routes the level of hydrocarbon in solution had always to be far greater than that present as paniculate food. Relevant to these observations was the further finding that after naphthalene had been accumulated directly from solution in sea water depuration was rapid and only a small fraction, less than 5%, of the original radioactivity could be detected after 10 days: by contrast, when the hydrocarbon was taken up by way of the food depuration was much slower, so that at the end of 10 days about a third of the original level of radioactivity still remained in the animals. Short-term experiments in which Calanus were fed on labelled diets for 24 h under bacteria-free conditions showed that at the end of this period over 90% of the radioactivity in the animals was present as unchanged naphthalene. However, more than two thirds of that released by the animals was in some form other than the hydrocarbon, a finding consistent with the view that Calanus is able to metabolize it.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 1976

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References

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