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On the nutrition and metabolism of zooplankton XI. Lipids in Calanus helgolandicus grazing Biddulphia sinensis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2009

J. R. Sargent
Affiliation:
N.E.R.C. Institute of Marine Biochemistry, Aberdeen AB1 3RA, Scotland
R. R. Gatten
Affiliation:
N.E.R.C. Institute of Marine Biochemistry, Aberdeen AB1 3RA, Scotland
E. D. S. Corner
Affiliation:
The Laboratory, Marine Biological Association, Citadel Hill, Plymouth
C. C. Kilvington
Affiliation:
The Laboratory, Marine Biological Association, Citadel Hill, Plymouth

Extract

Many of the calanoid copepods contain large amounts of neutral lipid that is predominantly wax esters (Lee, Hirota & Barnett, 1971; Lee & Hirota, 1973; Sargent & Garten, 1976). The role of these compounds in the life-history of copepods is particularly well documented for the large Northern Pacific calanoid Euchaeta japonica Marukawa. These animals have their highest levels of total lipid (50% of the dry weight) at stage V, up to 80% being wax esters (Lee, Nevenzel & Lewis, 1974). Wax ester levels are lower in adult females but are high in the eggs, the contents of which are subsequently used during the naupliar stages (Lee et al. 1974). Thus, wax esters accumulated during the later developmental stages provide a fuel for the developing eggs and embryos; from which it follows that the amounts of these lipids present in mature animals are likely to be critical in determining the brood size and survival of the ensuing generation. So far, however, the factors controlling lipid levels in copepods have been poorly understood.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 1977

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