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On the nutrition and metabolism of zooplankton. VIII. the grazing of Biddulphia cells by Calanus helgolandicus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2009

E. D. S. Corner
Affiliation:
The Plymouth Laboratory
R. N. Head
Affiliation:
The Plymouth Laboratory
C. C. Kilvington
Affiliation:
The Plymouth Laboratory

Extract

The rations removed by adult and stage V Calanus helgolandicus (Claus) feeding on large cells of the diatom Biddulphia sinensis Grev. were measured using an apparatus especially designed to keep the plant cells in suspension and estimated to reach a maximum of 1800 cells/animal/day at a food concentrationof 11,300 cells/1. A continual flow method was used to study feeding at very low algal concentrations and it was found that the animals still captured Biddulphia at a food level of only 270 cells/1.

The animals in the feeding experiments were used at a very low population density (6 copepods/1350 ml.) and the maximum value found for the volume of sea water swept clear – 700 ml./animal/day - was unusually high.

The maximum daily rations consumed by each animal were also high, being equivalent to 47–5 % of the body nitrogen and 46–4 % of the body phosphorus. The number of faecal pellets released by the animals increased with the size of ration captured, but the percentage of the ration lost as faecal pellets was fairly constant. In terms of dietary nitrogen the average value was 65–9% and that for dietary phosphorus 59·6%.

The percentage of the daily ration of nitrogen excreted in soluble form was 266% and that of phosphorus 41–2%, these values being significantly higher than those found using unfed animals. Nearly 90 % of the nitrogen excreted by the animals, whether feeding or unfed, was in the form of ammonia. The amounts of excreted ammonia and total soluble phosphorus increased significantly when the animals fed; but the small quantities of nitrogen released in forms other than ammonia did not change.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 1972

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References

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