Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-54cdcc668b-tx8dt Total loading time: 0.289 Render date: 2021-03-09T06:00:59.421Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

On Schedophilus Medusophagus (Pisces: Stromateoidei)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2009

Q. Bone
Affiliation:
The Plymouth Laboratory
C. E. R. Brook
Affiliation:
The Plymouth Laboratory

Extract

Stromateoid fishes form a small group among the Perciformes, characterized by remarkable toothed saccular outgrowths in the gullet just behind the last gill arch (Haedrich, 1967). Most are associated with medusae when young but are poorly known as adults. In addition to the diagnostic oesophageal teeth, a striking feature of many stromateoids is the curious subdermal canal system, whose function is unknown and whose structure has not been described in detail. The present note describes observations upon the biology of Schedophilus medusophagus Cocco, and upon the structure of its integument.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 1973

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bone, Q., 1972. Buoyancy and hydrodynamic function of integument in the castor oil fish, Ruvettus pretiosus (Pisces: Gempylidae). Copeia, 1, 7887.Google Scholar
Cocco, A., 1839. Sopra un nuovo genere di pesci della famiglia dei Centrolofini e di una nuova specie di Trachurus. L'Innominato, Messina, 3, 56–9.Google Scholar
Denton, E. J. & Marshall, N. B., 1958. The buoyancy of bathypelagic fishes without a swim-bladder. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 37, 753–67.Google Scholar
Gilchrist, J. D. F. & Bonde, C. Von, 1923. The stromateidae (butter fishes) collected by the S.S. ‘Pickle’. Fisheries and Marine Biological Survey Union of South Africa, Report no. 3, for the year 1922. Special Reports, IV, 12 pp.Google Scholar
Haedrich, R. L., 1967. The stromateoid fishes: systematics and a classification. Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College, 135, 31139.Google Scholar
Horn, M. L., 1970 a. Systematics and biology of the stromateid fishes of the genus Peprilus. Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College, 140, 165262.Google Scholar
Horn, M. L., 1970 b. The swimbladder as a juvenile organ in stromateoid fishes. Breviora, no. 359, pp. 19.Google Scholar
Jakubowski, M. & Oliva, O., 1967. Note on pearl organs of the stone loach Noemacheilus barbatulus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Osteichthyes, Cobitidae). Acta Societatis zoologicae bohemoslavicae, 31, 25–7.Google Scholar
Jarret, A., Spearman, R. I. & Hardy, J. A., 1959. The histochemistry of keratinization. British Journal of Dermatology, 71, 277–95.Google Scholar
Kramp, P. L., 1952. Reports of the Lund University Chile Expedition 1948–9. 2. Medusae collected by the Lund University Chile Expedition, 1948–9. Lunds universitets drsskrift. N.F. Avd. 2, 47, 119.Google Scholar
Mansueti, R., 1963. Symbiotic behaviour between small fishes and jellyfishes, with new data on that between the stromateid Peprilus alepidotus, and the scyphomedusa Chrysaora quinquecirrha. Copeia, 1, 4080.Google Scholar
Regan, C. T., 1902. A revision of the fishes of the family Stromateidae. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 10 (56), 115–31.Google Scholar
Walters, V., 1963. The trachipterid integument and an hypothesis on its hydrodynamic function. Copeia, no. 2, pp. 260–70.Google Scholar
Whitear, M., 1970. The skin surface of bony fishes. Journal of Zoology. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 160, 437–54.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 12 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 9th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

On Schedophilus Medusophagus (Pisces: Stromateoidei)
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

On Schedophilus Medusophagus (Pisces: Stromateoidei)
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

On Schedophilus Medusophagus (Pisces: Stromateoidei)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *