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Line Fishing on the Continental Slope the Selective Effect of Different Hook Patterns

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2009

G. R. Forster
Affiliation:
The Plymouth Laboratory

Extract

In 1971 and 1972 during the course of short cruises to the South Biscay area on R.V. ‘Sarsia’ several hauls were made with a 100 hook long-line on the Continental Slope at depths ranging from 800 to 3600 m. The hooks used were of two different patterns (Fig. 1) arranged alternately. The hooks were mounted on wire snoods of about 1 m length which were attached to the line at 10 m intervals by stainless-steel snap-on connectors. The object of this arrangement was to find out if the incurving hook pattern based on a traditional South Pacific type of wooden hook showed any advantage over a normal type of hook.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 1973

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References

Fox, H. C., 1897. The ethnology of Funafuti. Memoirs of the Australian Museum, 3, 229304.Google Scholar
Nordhoff, C. B., 1928. Fishing for the oilfish. Natural History, Nezv York, 28, 40–5.Google Scholar
Powell, R., 1964. Dropline fishing in deep water. In Modern Fishing Gear of the World, vol. 2, 603 pp. London: Fishing News (Books) Ltd.Google Scholar

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