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Policies for Priority Areas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2009

Extract

During the last six years Britain has had a boom in priority area policies: educational priority areas, community development and community action projects, the urban programme, the Department of the Environment's six cities projects, the planners’ comprehensive development areas and general improvement areas, neighbourhood councils and (most recently) the Home Office Deprivation Unit. These and other initiatives (repeatedly concerned with ‘areas’, ‘communities’, ‘neighbourhoods’ and ‘urban’ problems) have been the talk of all concerned with social policies.

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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1974

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References

1 For a fuller discussion of these developments, their origins and implications, see Donnison, David, ‘Micro-politics of the City’ in Donnison, David and Eversley, David (eds), London: Urban Patterns, Problems and Policies, London: Heinemann, 1973.Google Scholar

2 The point is made, from the other side of that gap, by Harvey, David in Social Justice and the City, London: Edward Arnold, 1973 (Chapter 1).Google Scholar

3 Social Science Research Council, Research on Poverty, London: Heinemann, 1968.Google Scholar

4 Rowntree, B. S., Poverty, A Study of Town Life, London: Macmillan, 1902.Google Scholar

5 See, for example, Miliband, Ralph, The State in Capitalist Society, London: Quartet Books, 1973.Google Scholar

6 Donnison, David (ed.), A Pattern of Disadvantage, Slough: National Foundation for Educational Research, 1972.Google Scholar

7 All recorded in Owen, David, English Philanthropy, 1660–1960, Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1964.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

8 For example: Half our Future, London: HMSO, 1963Google Scholar (the Newsom report); Report of the Committee on Housing in Greater London, London: HMSO, Cmnd 2605, 1965Google Scholar (the Milner Holland report); Children and their Primary Schools, London: HMSO, 1967Google Scholar (the Plowden report); Report of the Committee on Local Authority and Allied Personal Social Services, London: HMSO, Cmnd. 3703, 1968Google Scholar (the Seebohm report).

9 Little, Alan and Mabey, Christine, ‘Reading Attainment and Social and Ethnic Mix of London Primary Schools’, in Donnison and Eversley, op. cit.Google Scholar

10 Halsey, A. H. (ed.), Educational Priority, London: HMSO, 1973.Google Scholar

11 Little, and Mabey, , op. cit.Google Scholar

12 Such examples are found in SNAP 69/72, Liverpool Shelter Neighbourhood Action Project, 1972.Google Scholar

13 Legal Aid and Advice: Report of the Law Society, 1971–72, London: HMSO, 1973.Google Scholar

14 Children and their Primary Schools, op. cit.

15 Secretary of State, Department of the Environment.

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