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Age differences in false memories for visual scenes and the effect of prior recall

  • Xixi Dang (a1) (a2), Bi Zhu (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4), Chuansheng Chen (a5) and Xin Li (a1)

Abstract

This study investigated age differences in false memory for visual scenes and the effect of immediate recall on subsequent recognition. Eighty children (7–9 years), 74 adolescents (14–16 years), 92 young adults (19–26 years) and 82 older adults (50–80 years) studied four visual scenes and then took a recognition test after either a free-recall task or a filler task. Results showed an age-related decline in false recognition for visual scenes, but this trend was eliminated when participants were asked to free-recall before recognition. Prior recall decreased false recognition in children, but increased false recognition in older adults. Across the lifespan, adolescents had the loosest criterion, children had the lowest false recall, and prior recall increased true recognition in older adults.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Bi Zhu, Email: zhubi@bnu.edu.cn

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Keywords

Age differences in false memories for visual scenes and the effect of prior recall

  • Xixi Dang (a1) (a2), Bi Zhu (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4), Chuansheng Chen (a5) and Xin Li (a1)

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