Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Maps for Planning, Situation Assessment and Mission Control

  • R. M. Taylor (a1) and I. S. MacLeod (a2)

Extract

Maps are familiar objects that need little introduction. By strict definition, a map is a diagrammatic representation of the spatial environment – for example, the Earth's surface, the stars or parts thereof. The techniques of map-making, or cartography, are basically concerned with reducing the spatial characteristics of large surface areas to a form that makes them observable. Cartography has been considered as both a science and an art. As an art form and craft tradition with printed maps, cartography traditionally has sought to address aesthetic criteria for human appreciation and visual attractiveness, in addition to considerations of functional utility.

Copyright

References

Hide All
1Robinson, A. H. and Sale, R. D. (1969). Elements of Cartography. Wiley, New York.
2Keates, J. S. (1973). Cartographic Design and Production. Longman, London.
3Bainbridge, L. (1987). The ironies of automation. In New Technology and Human Error (ed. J., RasmussenK., Duncan and J., Laplat). Wiley, London.
4Hancock, P. A. (1995). Interface design for adaptive automation technologies. In DRA/CHS/HS3/TR95001/02, Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Human–Computer Teamwork, Cambridge, UK, 2730 September, 1994.
5Stokes, A.Wickens, C. & Kite, K. (1990). Display Technology: Human Factors Concepts. Society of Automotive Engineers, Warrandale, PA, USA.
6Ellis, R. D.Hepworth, R.Howells, H. & Bickerton, R. E. (1995). Structured and analytical knowledge acquisition methods for tactical KBS decision aids. In DRA/CHS/HS3/TR95001/02, Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Human–Computer Teamwork, Cambridge, UK, 2730 September, 1994.
7Noble, D. (1989). Schemata-based knowledge elicitation for planning and situation assessment aids. IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, 19, 473482.
8Langer, E. J. (1992). Matters of mind: mindfulness/mindlessness in perspective. In Consciousness and Cognition, 1, pp. 289305.
9Hollnagel, E. & Woods, D. D. (1983). Cognitive systems engineering: new wine in new bottles. International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 18, 583&600.
10Hoc, J-M.Cacciabue, P. C. and Hollnagel, E. (1995). Expertise and Technology: Cognition and Human–Computer Cooperation. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, UK.
11Crosby, P. B. (1979). Quality is free: The Art of Making Quality Free. McGraw-Hill.
12Taylor, R. M. and Selcon, S. J. (1990). Cognitive quality and situational awareness with advanced aircraft attitude displays. In Proceedings of the HFS 34th Annual Meeting, 1, pp. 2630. HFS, Santa Monica.
13Neisser, U. (1976). Cognition and Reality. Freeman, W. H., San, Francisco.
14Wickens, C. D. and Kramer, A. (1985). Engineering psychology. Annual Review of Psychology, 36, 307347.
15Taylor, R. M. (1995). CC-SART: The development of an experiential measure of cognitive compatibility in systems design. TTCP UTP-J Human Factors in Aircraft Environments, Annual Meeting, DCIEM, Toronto, Canada, 1216 June, 1995.
16Rasmussen, J. (1983). Skills, rules, and knowledge; signals, signs and symbols, and other distinctions in human performance models. IEEE Transcriptions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, Vol. SMC-13, No. 3, May/June.

Keywords

Maps for Planning, Situation Assessment and Mission Control

  • R. M. Taylor (a1) and I. S. MacLeod (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed