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Temperature-dependent electrical properties of graphene nanoplatelets film dropped on flexible substrates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 June 2014

Min Tian
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, People's Republic of China
Ying Huang*
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, People's Republic of China; and Institute of Intelligence Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, People's Republic of China
Weihua Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, People's Republic of China
Ruiqi Li
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, People's Republic of China
Ping Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, People's Republic of China
Caixia Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, People's Republic of China
Yugang Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Science and Applied Physics, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, People's Republic of China
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: hf.hy@163.com
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Abstract

The fabrication of a temperature sensor based on graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) is reported. A preheat process was carried out and the micrographs of both original and preheat-treated GNPs are observed and compared. Nonlinear temperature variation of resistance is observed and humidity interference is found to be negligible. Region of 10–60 °C (the linear region) is selected as the sensor range and further studied. High sensitivity of GNPs can be seen and the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of 0.0371 is calculated, higher than that of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and many other materials reported in references. Great repeatability and small hysteresis are obtained. The time constant of the GNPs film is about 5 s, much shorter than that of MWCNTs film. The result suggests that GNPs have potential applications for use in highly sensitive and fast-response temperature sensors.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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