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Shape-Controllable Synthesis of Indium Oxide Structures: Nanopyramids and Nanorods

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Ye Zhang
Affiliation:
School of Physics, National Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Physics, and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China
Hongbo Jia
Affiliation:
School of Physics, National Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Physics, and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China
Dapeng Yu
Affiliation:
School of Physics, National Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Physics, and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China
Xuhui Luo
Affiliation:
School of Physics, National Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Physics, and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China
Zhensheng Zhang
Affiliation:
School of Physics, National Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Physics, and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China
Xihong Chen
Affiliation:
School of Physics, National Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Physics, and Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China
Cheoljin Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Nanotechnology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea
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Abstract

We describe a vapor-phase route to the controllable synthesis of indium oxide micro-and nanopyramids on the silicon wafer via selective epitaxial vapor-solid growth by a methane-assist thermal reduction method. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the pyramids were cubic single crystals with a tetragonal symmetry. The size, morphology, and density of pyramids could easily be controlled by tuning reaction parameters. The method has good compatibility with other procedures involved in the microfabrication processes. Laterally grown indium oxide nanorods on the silicon wafer were also prepared via a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Those crystalline In2O3 nanorods were about 100 nm in diameter and 1 μm in length. The as-synthesized indium oxide nanopyramids and nanorods could offer novel opportunities for both fundamental research and technological applications.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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