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Reduced hot cracking susceptibility by controlling the fusion ratio in laser welding of dissimilar Al alloys joints

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 March 2015


Yulong Zhang
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China
Fenggui Lu
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China; and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072, People's Republic of China
Hui-Ping Wang
Affiliation:
Manufacturing Systems Research Lab, General Motors Global Research & Development, Warren, Michigan 48090, USA
Xiaojie Wang
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China
Haichao Cui
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China
Xinhua Tang
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

With the increasing usage of Al alloys in vehicle manufacture, it is necessary to join dissimilar Al alloys with lap joint. However, hot cracking is a challenging issue due to the chemical composition and thermal tension, which greatly determines the reliability of automobile operation. Among different Al alloys, the series 5000 (Al–Mg) and 6000 (Al–Mg–Si) are widely used. To better understand the hot cracking behavior, various stack ups of AA5754 and AA6013 were laser welded to investigate the effects of process parameters on hot cracking formation. The chemical composition, microstructure, fusion ratio, and fracture morphology of the weld joint were also examined. The results showed that the order of material stacking affected weld's susceptibility to hot cracking significantly, and the critical process parameters were obtained for tested conditions which could effectively reduce hot cracking. The findings from this work provide guidance for hot cracking prevention in laser welding of dissimilar Al alloys.


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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2015 

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