Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-77ffc5d9c7-27lgd Total loading time: 0.55 Render date: 2021-04-23T17:30:24.268Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Pristine graphene quantum dots for detection of copper ions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 July 2014

Xiaofeng Liu
Affiliation:
Center for Applied Chemical Research, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
Wei Gao
Affiliation:
Center for Applied Chemical Research, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
Xuemei Zhou
Affiliation:
Center for Applied Chemical Research, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
Yuanyuan Ma
Affiliation:
Center for Applied Chemical Research, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

To selectively detect Cu2+ ions is very important for controlling daily intake of Cu2+ ions and monitoring numerous biological processes. Fluorescence spectroscopic technique is a useful one for detection of copper ions. Previous methods always involve the use of metal Cd-based quantum dots (QDs), which suffer to the photobleaching and subsequent release of toxic metal ions. Herein, a simple method has been developed to detect Cu2+ ions by using pristine graphene QDs. Graphene QDs are synthesized by chemical oxidation of pitch graphite fibers. Our results indicate the photoluminescence (PL) of as-synthesized graphene QDs could be quenched by a group of metal ions while adding biothiol cysteine can only cause the significant recovery of the PL of graphene QDs quenched by Cu2+ ions. Our approach provides an easy and environmental friendly method for detection of Cu2+ ions and has the potential for future practical applications.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Kramer, R.: Fluorescent chemosensors for Cu2+ ions: Fast, selective, and highly sensitive. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 37, 772 (1998).3.0.CO;2-Z>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Georgopoulos, P.G., Roy, A., Yonone-Lioy, M.J., Opiekun, R.E., and Lioy, P.J.: Environmental copper: Its dynamics and human exposure issues. J. Toxicol. Environ. Health, B 4, 341 (2001).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gaggelli, E., Kozlowski, H., Valensin, D., and Valensin, G.: Copper homeostasis and neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer's, prion, and Parkinson's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Chem. Rev. 106, 1995 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jung, H.S., Kwon, P.S., Lee, J.W., Kim, J.I., Hong, C.S., Kim, J.W., Yan, S., Lee, J.Y., Lee, J.H., Joo, T., and Kim, J.S.: Coumarin-derived Cu2+-selective fluorescence sensor: Synthesis, mechanisms, and applications in living cells. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 2008 (2009).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chan, W.C.W., Maxwell, D.J., Gao, X.H., Bailey, R.E., Han, M.Y., and Nie, S.M.: Luminescent quantum dots for multiplexed biological detection and imaging. Curr. Opin. Biotechnol. 13, 40 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Basabe-Desmonts, L., Reinhoudt, D.N., and Crego-Calama, M.: Design of fluorescent materials for chemical sensing. Chem. Soc. Rev. 36, 993 (2007).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gill, R., Zayats, M., and Willner, I.: Semiconductor quantum dots for bioanalysis. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 47, 7602 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Freeman, R. and Willner, I.: Optical molecular sensing with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Chem. Soc. Rev. 41, 4067 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, J., Li, B., Zhang, L.M., and Jiang, H.: An optical sensor for Cu(II) detection with upconverting luminescent nanoparticles as an excitation source. Chem. Commun. 48, 4860 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Xie, H.Y., Liang, H.G., Zhang, Z.L., Liu, Y., He, Z.K., and Pang, D.W.: Luminescent CdSe-ZnS quantum dots as selective Cu2+ probe. Spectrochim. Acta, Part A 60, 2527 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fernandez-Arguelles, M.T., Jin, W.J., Costa-Fernandez, J.M., Pereiro, R., and Sanz-Medel, A.: Surface-modified CdSe quantum dots for the sensitive and selective determination of Cu(II) in aqueous solutions by luminescent measurements. Anal. Chim. Acta 549, 20 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chan, Y.H., Chen, J.X., Liu, Q.S., Wark, S.E., Son, D.H., and Batteas, J.D.: Ultrasensitive copper(II) detection using plasmon-enhanced and photo-brightened luminescence of CdSe quantum dots. Anal. Chem. 82, 3671 (2010).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wu, C.S., Oo, M.K.K., and Fan, X.D.: Highly sensitive multiplexed heavy metal detection using quantum-dot-labeled DNAzymes. ACS Nano 4, 5897 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wang, G.L., Dong, Y.M., and Li, Z.J.: Metal ion (silver, cadmium and zinc ions) modified CdS quantum dots for ultrasensitive copper ion sensing. Nanotechnology 22, 085503 (2011).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Guo, C.X., Wang, J.L., Cheng, J., and Dai, Z.F.: Determination of trace copper ions with ultrahigh sensitivity and selectivity utilizing CdTe quantum dots coupled with enzyme inhibition. Biosens. Bioelectron. 36, 69 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yang, P., Zhao, Y., Lu, Y., Xu, Q.Z., Xu, X.W., Dong, L., and Yu, S.H.: Phenol formaldehyde resin nanoparticles loaded with CdTe quantum dots: A fluorescence resonance energy transfer probe for optical visual detection of copper(II) ions. ACS Nano 5, 2147 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shen, Y.Y., Li, L.L., Lu, Q., Ji, J., Fei, R., Zhang, J.R., Abdel-Halim, E.S., and Zhu, J.J.: Microwave-assisted synthesis of highly luminescent CdSeTe@ZnS–SiO2 quantum dots and their application in the detection of Cu(II). Chem. Commun. 48, 2222 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sung, T.W. and Lo, Y.L.: Highly sensitive and selective sensor based on silica-coated CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles for Cu2+ ion detection. Sens. Actuator, B Chem. 165, 119 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hardman, R.: A toxicologic review of quantum dots: Toxicity depends on physicochemical and environmental factors. Environ. Health Perspect. 114, 165 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lewinski, N., Colvin, V., and Drezek, R.: Cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Small 4, 26 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Klaine, S.J., Alvarez, P.J.J., Batley, G.E., Fernandes, T.F., Handy, R.D., Lyon, D.Y., Mahendra, S., McLaughlin, M.J., and Lead, J.R.: Nanomaterials in the environment: Behavior, fate, bioavailability, and effects. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 27, 1825 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reiss, P., Protiere, M., and Li, L.: Core/shell semiconductor nanocrystals. Small 5, 154 (2009).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Donega, C.M.: Synthesis and properties of colloidal heteronanocrystals. Chem. Soc. Rev. 40, 1512 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fan, J.Y. and Chu, P.K.: Group IV nanoparticles: Synthesis, properties, and biological applications. Small 6, 2080 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baker, S.N. and Baker, G.A.: Luminescent carbon nanodots: Emergent nanolights. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 49, 6726 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Liu, S., Tian, J.Q., Wang, L., Zhang, Y.W., Qin, X.Y., Luo, Y.L., Asiri, A.M., Al-Youbi, A.O., and Sun, X.P.: Hydrothermal treatment of grass: A low-cost, green route to nitrogen-doped, carbon-rich, photoluminescent polymer nanodots as an effective fluorescent sensing platform for label-free detection of Cu(II) ions. Adv. Mater. 24, 2037 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Qu, Q., Zhu, A., Shao, X., Shi, G., and Tian, Y.: Development of a carbon quantum dots-based fluorescent Cu2+ probe suitable for living cell imaging. Chem. Commun. 48, 5473 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wang, F., Gu, Z., Lei, W., Wang, W., Xia, X., and Hao, Q.: Graphene quantum dots as a fluorescent sensing platform for highly efficient detection of copper (II) ions. Sens. Actuators, B Chem. 190, 516 (2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cao, L., Meziani, M.J., Sahu, S., and Sun, X.P.: Photoluminescence properties of graphene versus other carbon nanomaterials. Acc. Chem. Res. 46, 171 (2013).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yan, X., Cui, X., Li, B.S., and Li, L.S.: Large solution-processable graphene quantum dots as light absorbers for photovoltaics. Nano Lett. 10, 1869 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zhuo, S.J., Shao, M.W., and Lee, S.T.: Upconversion and downconversion fluorescent graphene quantum dots: Ultrasonic preparation and photocatalysis. ACS Nano 6, 1059 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gupta, V., Chaudhary, N., Srivastava, R., Sharma, G.D., Bhardwaj, R., and Cand, S.: Luminescent graphene quantum dots for organic photovoltaic devices. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 9960 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williams, K.J., Nelson, C.A., Yan, X., Li, L.S., and Zhu, X.Y.: Hot electron injection from graphene quantum dots to TiO2 . ACS Nano 7, 1388 (2013).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, Y., Zhao, Y., Cheng, H.H., Hu, Y., Shi, G.Q., Dai, L.M., and Qu, L.T.: Nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots with oxygen-rich functional groups. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134, 15 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tang, L.B., Ji, R.B., Cao, X.K., Lin, J.Y., Jiang, H.X., Li, X.M., Teng, K.S., Luk, C.M., Zeng, S.J., Hao, J.H., and Lau, S.P.: Deep ultraviolet photoluminescence of water-soluble self-passivated graphene quantum dots. ACS Nano 6, 5102 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pan, D.Y., Zhang, J.C., Li, Z., and Wu, M.H.: Hydrothermal route for cutting graphene sheets into blue-luminescent graphene quantum dots. Adv. Mater. 22, 734 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Peng, J., Gao, W., Gupta, B.K., Liu, Z., Romero-Aburto, R., Ge, L.H., Song, L., Alemany, L.B., Zhan, X.B., Gao, G.H., Vithayathil, S.A., Kaipparettu, B.A., Marti, A.A., Hayashi, T., Zhu, J.J., and Ajayan, P.M.: Graphene quantum dots derived from carbon fibers. Nano Lett. 12, 844 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Liu, R.L., Wu, D.Q., Feng, X.L., and Mullen, K.: Bottom-up fabrication of photoluminescent graphene quantum dots with uniform morphology. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 15221 (2011).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lee, J., Kim, K., Park, W.I., Kim, B.H., Park, J.H.. Kim, T.H., Bong, S., Kim, C.H., Chae, G., Jun, M., Hwang, Y., Jung, Y.S., and Jeon, S.: Uniform graphene quantum dots patterned from self-assembled silica nanodots. Nano Lett. 12, 6078 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Luo, Z.T., Lu, Y., Somers, L.A., and Johnson, A.T.C.: High yield preparation of macroscopic graphene oxide membranes. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 898 (2009).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sun, Y.P., Zhou, B., Lin, Y., Wang, W., Fernando, K.A.S., Pathak, P., Meziani, M.J., Harruff, B. A., Wang, X., Wang, H.F., Luo, P.J.G., Yang, H., Kose, M.E., Chen, B.L., Veca, L.M., and Xie, S.Y.: Quantum-sized carbon dots for bright and colorful photoluminescence. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126, 7756 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yang, S.T., Cao, L., Luo, P.G.J., Lu, F.S., Wang, X., Wang, H.F., Meziani, M.J., Liu, Y.F., Qi, G., and Sun, X.P.: Carbon dots for optical imaging in vivo. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 11308 (2009).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Liu, H.B., Zhu, H.N., Eggers, D.K., Nersissian, A.M., Faull, K.F., Goto, J.J., Ai, J.Y., Sanders-Loehr, J., Gralla, E.B., and Valentine, J.S.: Copper (2+) binding to the surface residue cysteine 111 of His46Arg human copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, a familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mutant. Biochemistry 39, 8125 (2000).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rigo, A., Corazza, A., Paolo, M.L., Rossetto, M., Ugolini, R., and Scarpa, M.: Interaction of copper with cysteine: Stability of cuprous complexes and catalytic role of cupric ions in anaerobic thiol oxidation. J. Inorg. Biochem. 98, 1495 (2004).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Liu et al. supplementary material

Supplementary figures

File 225 KB

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 36
Total number of PDF views: 119 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 23rd April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Pristine graphene quantum dots for detection of copper ions
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Pristine graphene quantum dots for detection of copper ions
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Pristine graphene quantum dots for detection of copper ions
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *