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Optical absorption of Co2+ in MgIn2S4, CdIn2S4, and HgIn2S4 spinel crystals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Seok-Joo Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Guseong-dong 373–1, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305–701, Korea
Jae-Eun Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Guseong-dong 373–1, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305–701, Korea
Hae Yong Park
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Guseong-dong 373–1, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305–701, Korea
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Abstract

The optical absorption spectra of cobalt-doped MgIn2S4, CdIn2S4, and HgIn2S4 single crystals grown by a chemical transport reaction were investigated at 7 K. The values of Dq and B calculated from the observed spectra show that the d electrons are more delocalized in the order of MgIn2S4, CdIn2S4, and HgIn2S4. Because this order corresponds to the decreasing order of the electronegativity differences between the metal and sulfur atoms of the host crystals, we conclude that as the metal-sulfur bonds in the host crystals are more covalent, the d electrons of the cobalt impurities are more spread out and the cobalt-sulfur bonds are also more covalent.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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