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Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of titanium oxide for microelectronics applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Kanchana Vydianathan
Affiliation:
New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology and Department of Physics, The University at Albany—SUNY, Albany, New York 12222
Guillermo Nuesca
Affiliation:
New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology and Department of Physics, The University at Albany—SUNY, Albany, New York 12222
Gregory Peterson
Affiliation:
New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology and Department of Physics, The University at Albany—SUNY, Albany, New York 12222
Eric T. Eisenbraun
Affiliation:
New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology and Department of Physics, The University at Albany—SUNY, Albany, New York 12222
Alain E. Kaloyeros*
Affiliation:
New York State Center for Advanced Thin Film Technology and Department of Physics, The University at Albany—SUNY, Albany, New York 12222
John J. Sullivan
Affiliation:
MKS Instruments, Incorporated, Andover, Massachusetts 01810
Bin Han
Affiliation:
MKS Instruments, Incorporated, Andover, Massachusetts 01810
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author.
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Abstract

A chemical vapor deposition process has been developed for titanium dioxide (TiOx) for applications as capacitor dielectric in sub-quarter-micron dynamic random-access memory devices, and as gate insulators in emerging generations of etal-oxide-semiconductor transistors. Studies using the β-diketonate source precursor (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato) titanium were carried out to examine the underlying mechanisms that control film nucleation and growth kinetics and to establish the effects of key process parameters on film purity, composition, texture, morphology, and electrical properties. Resulting film properties were thoroughly analyzed by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused-ion-beam SEM, and capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements. The study resulted in the identification of an optimized process for the deposition of an anatase–rutile TiOx film with a dielectric constant approximately 85 at 1 MHz for a 330-nm thickness, and a leakage current below 2 × 10−8 A/cm2 for bias voltage values up to 3.5 V.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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