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Mechanically induced solid-state reaction for synthesizing glassy Co75Ti25 soft magnet alloy powders with a wide supercooled liquid region

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

M. Sherif El-Eskandarany
Affiliation:
Inoue Superliquid Glass Project, ERATO, JST, Yagiyama-minami, 2–1–1, Sendai 982–0807, Japan
Wei Zhang
Affiliation:
Inoue Superliquid Glass Project, ERATO, JST, Yagiyama-minami, 2–1–1, Sendai 982–0807, Japan
A. Inoue
Affiliation:
Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2–1–1, Sendai 980–8577, Japan
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Abstract

A single phase of glassy Co75Ti25 alloy powders was synthesized by high-energy ball milling the elemental powders at room temperature, using the mechanical alloying method. The final product of the glassy alloy, which is obtained after ball milling for 86 ks, exhibits soft magnetic properties with polarization and coercivity values of 0.67 T and 2.98 kA/m, respectively. This binary glassy alloy, in which its glass transition temperature (Tg) lies at a rather high temperature (833 K), transforms into face-centered-cubic Co3Ti (ordered phase) at 889 K through a single sharp exothermic reaction with an enthalpy change of crystallization (ΔHx) of −2.35 kJ/mol. The supercooled liquid region before crystallization ΔTx of the synthesized glassy powders shows an extraordinary high value (56 K) for a metallic binary system. The reduced glass transition temperature [ratio between Tg and liquidus temperatures, Tl (Tg/Tl)] was 0.56. We also demonstrated postannealing experiments of the mechanically deformed Co/Ti multilayered composite powders. The results show that annealing of the powders at 710 K leads to the formation of a glassy phase (thermally enhanced glass formation reaction). Its heat formation was measured directly and found to be −0.56 kJ/mol. The similarity in the crystallization and magnetization behaviors between the two classes of as-annealed and as-mechanically alloyed glassy powders implies the formation of the same glassy phase.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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Mechanically induced solid-state reaction for synthesizing glassy Co75Ti25 soft magnet alloy powders with a wide supercooled liquid region
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