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Low-temperature metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of Al2O3 for advanced complementary metal-oxide semiconductor gate dielectric applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Spyridon Skordas
Affiliation:
School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering and the University of Albany Institute for Materials, The University at Albany–State University of New York, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203
Filippos Papadatos
Affiliation:
School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering and the University of Albany Institute for Materials, The University at Albany–State University of New York, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203
Guillermo Nuesca
Affiliation:
School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering and the University of Albany Institute for Materials, The University at Albany–State University of New York, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203
John J. Sullivan
Affiliation:
School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering and the University of Albany Institute for Materials, The University at Albany–State University of New York, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203
Eric T. Eisenbraun
Affiliation:
School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering and the University of Albany Institute for Materials, The University at Albany–State University of New York, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203
Alain E. Kaloyeros
Affiliation:
School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering and the University of Albany Institute for Materials, The University at Albany–State University of New York, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203
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Abstract

A low-temperature metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process was developed and optimized, using a design of experiments approach, for the growth of ultrathin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) as a potential gate dielectric in emerging semiconductor device applications. The process used the aluminum β-diketonate metalorganic precursor [aluminum(III) 2,4-pentanedionate] and water as, respectively, the metal and oxygen source reactants to grow Al2O3 films over a temperature range from 250 to 450 °C. The resulting films were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction measurements, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear-reaction analysis for hydrogen profiling, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The as-deposited Al2O3 phase was amorphous and dense and exhibited carbon and hydrogen incorporation of, respectively, 1 and 10 at.%. Postannealing at 600 °C led to a reduction in hydrogen concentration to 1 at.%, while maintaining an amorphous Al2O3 matrix.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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Low-temperature metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of Al2O3 for advanced complementary metal-oxide semiconductor gate dielectric applications
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