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Low-temperature growth of ZnO nanowires

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011


Yung-Kuan Tseng
Affiliation:
Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, 101 Section 2 Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, Republic of China
I-Nan Lin
Affiliation:
Materials Science Center, National Tsing-Hua University, 101 Section 2 Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, Republic of China
Kuo-Shung Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, 101 Section 2 Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, Republic of China
Tzer-Shen Lin
Affiliation:
Materials Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Bldg. 77, 195 Section 4 Chung Hsing Road, Chutung, Hsinchu 310, Taiwan, Republic of China
I-Cherng Chen
Affiliation:
Materials Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Bldg. 77, 195 Section 4 Chung Hsing Road, Chutung, Hsinchu 310, Taiwan, Republic of China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

ZnO nanowires with diameters of 40–200 nm were grown with a gold catalyst in bulk quantities on alumina substrates and sapphire substrates. This synthesis procedure was achieved by heating a 1:1 mixture of ZnO and Zn powder to 500 °C with trace water vapor as an oxidizer. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the nanowires were in the pure wurtzite phase. Photoluminescence spectroscopy showed two peaks: one was a strong ultraviolet emission at around 380 nm, which corresponds to the near-band-edge emission; the other was a weak near-infrared emission around 750 nm, which indicates a low concentration of oxygen vacancy. Moreover, we observed that the Zn/Au alloy droplets appeared on the tips of ZnO nanowires. As a consequence, we can select areas to grow ZnO nanowires by patterning the thin metal film on the substrates. These findings prove that the low-temperature growth mechanism is via vapor–liquid–solid rather than vapor transport deposition or vapor supersaturation (vapor–solid) mechanism. On the basis of the site-specific growth and the low-temperature requirement developed from this work, the synthesis of ZnO is compatible to microelectric machining system processing.


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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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