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The influence of ∑3 twin boundaries on the formation of radiation-induced defect clusters in nanotwinned Cu

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2011

Michael J. Demkowicz
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
Osman Anderoglu
Affiliation:
MPA-CINT: Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545; and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843
Xinghang Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843
Amit Misra
Affiliation:
MPA-CINT: Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545
Corresponding
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Abstract

We investigate the collective effect of a high volume fraction of ∑3 twin boundaries on the response of nanotwinned Cu to high dose He implantation near room temperature and find that they do not curtail the formation of vacancy and interstitial clusters. This result is rationalized through atomistic modeling, which shows that point defects at these boundaries have nearly identical properties to those in pure fcc Cu.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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The influence of ∑3 twin boundaries on the formation of radiation-induced defect clusters in nanotwinned Cu
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