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Formation of SrBi2Ta2O9: Part I. Synthesis and characterization of a novel “sol-gel” solution for production of ferroelectric SrBi2Ta2O9 thin films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Timothy J. Boyle*
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, 1001 University Boulevard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106
Catherine D. Buchheit
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, 1001 University Boulevard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106
Mark A. Rodriguez
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, 1001 University Boulevard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106
Husam N. Al-Shareef
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, 1001 University Boulevard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106
Bernadette A. Hernandez
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, 1001 University Boulevard SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106
Brian Scott
Affiliation:
Chemical Science and Technology Division, X-ray Diffraction Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratories, CST-18, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545
Joseph W. Ziller
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, X-ray Diffraction Laboratory, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92717
*
a)Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
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Abstract

We have developed a simple and rapid method for the synthesis of a precursor solution used in the production of SBT powders and thin films of the layered-perovskite phase SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT). Precursor solution preparation takes less than 30 min and involves the generation of two solutions: (a) Bi(O2CMe)3 dissolved in pyridine and (b) Ta(OCH2Me)5 added to Sr(O2CMe)2 and then solubilized by HO2CMe. After stirring separately for 10 min, these solutions are combined, stirred for an additional 10 min, and used without any further modifications. The individual solutions and ternary mixture were studied using a variety of analytical techniques. Films of the layered-perovskite phase were formed at temperatures as low as 700 °C. Ferroelectric testing of SBT films, fired at 750 °C, reveals standard hysteresis loops with no fatigue for up to 4 × 109 cycles.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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References

REFERENCES

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Formation of SrBi2Ta2O9: Part I. Synthesis and characterization of a novel “sol-gel” solution for production of ferroelectric SrBi2Ta2O9 thin films
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