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Estimation of the infrared absorption of ZnCl2–KBr glass by molecular dynamics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Satoru Inoue
Affiliation:
Department of Inorganic Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-21-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 Japan
Mitsuru Tamaki
Affiliation:
Department of Inorganic Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-21-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 Japan
Hiroshi Kawazoe
Affiliation:
Department of Inorganic Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-21-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 Japan
Masayuki Yamane
Affiliation:
Department of Inorganic Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-21-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 Japan
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Abstract

Molecular dynamic calculations have been made on glasses in the ZnCl2–KBr system in order to estimate the infrared (IR) absorption of these glasses. Oxygen-free glass was estimated to be transparent up to 25 μm. Glasses containing oxygen impurities were estimated to be transparent only up to 16 μm, with a weak absorption band around 10.4 μm. This agrees with experimental results of glasses in the ZnCl2–KBr–PbBr2 system.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1987

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