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Electromagnetic interference shielding and mechanical properties of Si3N4–SiOC composites fabricated by 3D-printing combined with polymer infiltration and pyrolysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 May 2017


Wenyan Duan
Affiliation:
Science and Technology on Thermostructural Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, China
Zhe Fan
Affiliation:
Science and Technology on Thermostructural Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, China
Hui Wang
Affiliation:
Science and Technology on Thermostructural Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, China
Jingyi Zhang
Affiliation:
Science and Technology on Thermostructural Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, China
Tianlu Qiao
Affiliation:
Science and Technology on Thermostructural Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, China
Xiaowei Yin
Affiliation:
Science and Technology on Thermostructural Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Twinned silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires (NWs) reinforced Si3N4–SiOC composites were successfully fabricated through a joint process of three-dimensional printing (3DP), direct nitridation, and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP). 3DP and PIP were both addictive manufacturing processes, enabling the near net shape fabrication and microstructure designing of Si3N4–SiOC. With the increase of the PIP cycle number, the pores of Si3N4 were mostly filled with polymer-derived ceramics-silicon oxycarbide (containing SiC NWs and free carbons), which led to the increase of electrical conductivity of Si3N4–SiOC composites. With the increase of SiOC ceramics, the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of Si3N4–SiOC composites increased from 2 dB to 35 dB, in which the absorption shielding effectiveness increased to 27 dB. The flexural strength of Si3N4–SiOC composites reached 63 MPa when the content of SiOC ceramics was 50.1 wt%. It is indicated that Si3N4–SiOC ceramics are a promising electromagnetic shielding and structural material.


Type
Invited Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2017 

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Footnotes

Contributing Editor: Nahum Travitzky

b)

This author was an editor of this journal during the review and decision stage. For the JMR policy on review and publication of manuscripts authored by editors, please refer to http://www.mrs.org/editor-manuscripts/.

A previous error in this article has been corrected, see 10.1557/jmr.2017.245.


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