Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-kbg4c Total loading time: 3.609 Render date: 2021-04-13T09:49:28.237Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Electrical properties of SnO2:Sb ultrathin films prepared by colloidal deposition process

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 January 2016

Tiago G. Conti
Affiliation:
LIEC, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, São Paulo 13565-905, Brazil
Adenilson J. Chiquito
Affiliation:
NanoLab, Department of Physics, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, São Paulo 13565-905, Brazil
Edson R. Leite
Affiliation:
LIEC, Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, São Paulo 13565-905, Brazil
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

In the present work, we are investigating the electronic transport mechanism for antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) ultrathin films produced by a colloidal deposition process (CDP) of nanocrystals synthesized via a solvothermal route in organic medium. The ATO ultrathin films were prepared from nanoparticles containing 9 mol% of Sb and the observed electrical resistivity at room temperature was 1.55, 1.10 × 10−1, and 1.83 × 10−3 Ω cm, respectively, for the 40, 45, and 71 nm films. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy were carried out to investigate the films and electrical resistivity measurements taken in the four-probe mode with temperature ranging from −260 to 27 °C (13–300 K ± 0.1 K). Results show a good data fitting on Mott's two-dimensional (2D) noninteracting variable range hopping for the 45 nm thin film, which is not further observed for the ATO ultrathin films obtained from CDP.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Kovalenko, M.V., Manna, L., Cabot, A., Hens, Z., Talapin, D.V., Kagan, C.R., Klimov, V.I., Rogach, A.L., Reiss, P., Milliron, D.J., Guyot-Sionnnest, P., Konstantatos, G., Parak, W.J., Hyeon, T., Korgel, B.A., Murray, C.B., and Heiss, W.: Prospects of nanoscience with nanocrystals. ACS Nano 9, 1012 (2015).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gonçalves, R.H. and Leite, E.R.: The colloidal nanocrystal deposition process: An advanced method to prepare high performance hematite photoanodes for water splitting. Energy Environ. Sci. 7, 2250 (2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gonçalves, R.H., Leite, L.D.T., and Leite, E.R.: Colloidal WO3 nanowires as a versatile route to prepare a photoanode for solar water splitting. ChemSusChem 5, 234 (2012).Google Scholar
Gonçalves, R.H., Lima, B.H.R., and Leite, E.R.: Magnetite colloidal nanocrystals: A facile pathway to prepare mesoporous hematite thin films for photoelectrochemical water splitting. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 6012 (2011).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pinheiro, A.N., Firmiano, E.G.S., Rabelo, A.C., Dalmaschio, C.J., and Leite, E.R.: Revisiting SrTiO3 as a photoanode for water splitting: Development of thin films with enhanced charge separation under standard solar irradiation. RSC Adv. 4, 2029 (2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conti, T.G., Chiquito, A.J., da Silva, R.O., Longo, E., and Leite, E.R.: Electrical properties of highly conducting SnO2:Sb nanocrystals synthesized by a nonaqueous sol–gel method. J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 93, 3862 (2010).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Batzill, M. and Diebold, U.: The surface and materials science of tin oxide. Prog. Surf. Sci. 79, 47 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Amma, D.S.D., Vaidyan, V.K., and Manoj, P.K.: Structural, electrical and optical studies on chemically deposited tin oxide films from inorganic precursors. Mater. Chem. Phys. 93, 194 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Singh, A.V., Mehra, R.M., Yoshida, A., and Wakahara, A.: Doping mechanism in aluminum doped zinc oxide films. J. Appl. Phys. 95, 3640 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fattakhova-Rohlfing, D., Brezesinski, T., Rathouský, J., Feldhoff, A., Oekermann, T., Wark, M., and Smarsly, B.: Transparent conductive films of indium tin oxide with 3D mesopore architecture. Adv. Mater. 18, 2980 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
James, K., Schweizer, H.P., and Kern, W.: Chemical vapor deposition of antimony-doped tin oxide films formed from dibutyl tin diacetate. J. Electrochem. Soc.: Solid State Sci. Technol. 123, 270 (1976).Google Scholar
Shanthi, E., Dutta, V., Banerjee, A., and Chopra, K.L.: Electrical and optical properties of undoped and antimony-doped tin oxide films. J. Appl. Phys. 51, 6243 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaneko, H. and Miyake, K.: Physical properties of antimony-doped tin oxide thick films. J. Appl. Phys. 53, 3629 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kim, K.H. and Lee, S.W.: Effect of antimony addition on electrical and optical properties of tin oxide film. J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 77, 915 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Terrier, C., Chatelon, J.P., and Roger, J.A.: Electrical and optical properties of Sb:SnO2 thin films obtained by the sol–gel method. Thin Solid Films 295, 95 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rajpure, K.Y., Kusumade, M.N., Neumann-Spallart, M.N., and Bhosale, C.H.: Effect of Sb doping on properties of conductive spray deposited SnO2 thin films. Mater. Chem. Phys. 64, 184 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tsukuma, K., Akiyama, T., and Imai, H.: Hydrolysis deposition of thin films of antimony-doped tin oxide. J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 84, 869 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thangaraju, B.: Structural, and electrical studies on highly conducting spray deposited fluorine and antimony doped SnO2 thin films from SnCl2 precursor. Thin Solid Films 402, 71 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Elangovan, E. and Ramamurthi, K.: A study on low cost-high conducting fluorine and antimony-doped tin oxide thin films. Appl. Surf. Sci. 249, 183 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, J., Gao, L., and Chen, M.: Spark plasma sintering of high-density antimony-doped tin oxide ceramics from nanoparticles. J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 89, 3874 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Giraldi, T.R., Escote, M.T., Maciel, A.P., Longo, E., Leite, E.R., and Varela, J.A.: Transport and sensors properties of nanostructured antimony-doped tin oxide films. Thin Solid Films 515, 2678 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Müller, V., Rasp, M., Stefanic, G., Ba, J., Günther, S., Rathousky, J., Niederberger, M., and Fattakhova-Rohlfing, D.: Highly conducting nanosized monodispersed antimony-doped tin oxide particles synthesized via nonaqueous sol–gel procedure. Chem. Mater. 21, 5229 (2009).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, Y., Brezesinski, T., Antonietti, M., and Smarsly, B.: Ordered mesoporous Sb-, Nb-, and Ta-doped SnO2 thin films with adjustable doping levels and high electrical conductivity. ACS Nano 3, 1373 (2009).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Luo, L., Bozyigit, D., Wood, V., and Niederberger, M.: High-quality transparent electrodes spin-cast from preformed antimony-doped tin oxide nanocrystals for thin film optoelectronics. Chem. Mater. 25, 4901 (2013).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hoel, C.A., Mason, T.O., Gaillard, J.F., and Poeppelmeier, K.R.: Transparent conducting oxides in the ZnO-In2O3-SnO2 system. Chem. Mater. 22, 3569 (2010).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Niederberger, M.: Nonaqueous sol–gel routes to metal oxide nanoparticles. Acc. Chem. Res. 40, 793 (2007).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ba, J.H., Polleux, J., Antonietti, M., and Niederberger, M.: Non-aqueous synthesis of tin oxide nanocrystals and their assembly into ordered porous mesostructures. Adv. Mater. 17, 2509 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pinna, N.: The benzyl alcohol route: An elegant approach towards organic–inorganic hybrid nanomaterials. J. Mater. Chem. 17, 2769 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Skoromets, V., Nemec, H., Kopecek, J., Kuzel, P., Peters, K., Fattakhova-Rohlfing, D., Vetushka, A., Muller, M., Ganzerova, K., and Fejfar, A.: Conductivity mechanisms in Sb-doped SnO2 nanoparticle assemblies: DC and terahertz regime. J. Phys. Chem. C 119, 19485 (2015).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 29
Total number of PDF views: 74 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 13th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Electrical properties of SnO2:Sb ultrathin films prepared by colloidal deposition process
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Electrical properties of SnO2:Sb ultrathin films prepared by colloidal deposition process
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Electrical properties of SnO2:Sb ultrathin films prepared by colloidal deposition process
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *