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Effect of growth conditions on the composition and structure of Si1−xGex nanowires grown by vapor–liquid–solid growth

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

Kok-Keong Lew
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering and The Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
Ling Pan
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering and The Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
Elizabeth C. Dickey
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering and The Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
Joan M. Redwing
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering and The Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
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Abstract

The effect of growth conditions on the composition and structure of Si1−xGex nanowires grown by the vapor–liquid–solid method using gaseous precursors (SiH4 and GeH4) was investigated. Transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the structural properties and elemental composition of the nanowires. At higher growth temperatures (>425 °C), Ge thin film deposition on the nanowire surface resulted in Au loss during growth and the formation of tapered structures. By simultaneously reducing the growth temperature from 425 to 325 °C to suppress the rate of Ge film deposition and increasing the GeH4/(GeH4 + SiH4) gas ratio, Si1−xGex nanowires were produced with Ge fractions spanning the entire composition range. The Ge fraction follows that predicted from the elemental nanowire growth rates in the Ge-rich (x > 0.5) regime, but deviates to higher Ge fractions in Si-rich (x < 0.5) nanowires. A mechanism was proposed whereby surface diffusion provides an additional pathway to Ge incorporation in Si-rich Si1−xGex nanowires.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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References

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Effect of growth conditions on the composition and structure of Si1−xGex nanowires grown by vapor–liquid–solid growth
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