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Controlled generation of ferromagnetic martensite from paramagnetic austenite in AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

E. Menéndez
Affiliation:
Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain; and Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
J. Sort
Affiliation:
Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA) and Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
J. Fassbender
Affiliation:
Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
M.D. Baró
Affiliation:
Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
J. Nogués
Affiliation:
Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA) and Institut Català de Nanotecnologia, Edifici CM7, Campus Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain
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Abstract

The strain-induced austenite (γ) to martensite (α′) transformation in AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel, either in powders or bulk specimens, has been investigated. The phase transformation is accomplished using either ball-milling processes (in powders)—dynamic approach—or by uniaxial compression procedures (in bulk specimens)—quasi-static approach. Remarkably, an increase in the loading rate causes opposite effects in each case: (i) it increases the amount of transformed α′ in ball-milling procedures, but (ii) it decreases the amount of α′ in pressed samples. Both the microstructural changes (e.g., crystallite size refinement, microstrains, or type of stacking faults) in the parent γ phase and the role of the concomitant temperature rise during deformation seem to be responsible for these opposite trends. Furthermore, the results show the correlation between the γ → α′ phase transformation and the development of magnetism and enhanced hardness.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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Controlled generation of ferromagnetic martensite from paramagnetic austenite in AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel
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