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Anodized TiO2 nanotubes coated with Pt nanoparticles for enhanced photoelectrocatalytic activity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2017


Yan Liu
Affiliation:
College of Environment, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, China
Dong Su
Affiliation:
College of Environment, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, China
Yanzong Zhang
Affiliation:
College of Environment, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, China
Lilin Wang
Affiliation:
College of Environment, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, China
Gang Yang
Affiliation:
College of Environment, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, China
Fei Shen
Affiliation:
College of Environment, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, China
Shihuai Deng
Affiliation:
College of Environment, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, China
Xiaohong Zhang
Affiliation:
College of Environment, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, China
Shirong Zhang
Affiliation:
College of Environment, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

TiO2 nanotubes have been demonstrated with promising future in photoelectrocatalytic (PEC)_ applications and deposition of Pt nanoparticles on TiO2 has been widely used to enhance their PEC activities. However, those Pt nanoparticles are normally randomly deposited on the surface of TiO2 nanotubes. Selective deposition of Pt nanoparticles is important to achieve better charge separation. In this study, we reported an electrochemical activation step to prepare TiO2 nanotubes deposited with Pt nanoparticles on their open ends. The “activation step” played a key role in achieving a clean surface of the TiO2 nanotubes, thus ensuring the uniform growth of Pt nanoparticles and efficient photogenerated electrons transportation. The Pt-A-TiO2 films have photocatalytic activities in hydrogen generation and methyl orange degradation with a high hydrogen generation rate of 0.74 mL/h/cm2, three times that of the pure TiO2 nanotubes (0.24 mL/h/cm2). Thus, this study demonstrated an effective method for improving the performance of Pt/TiO2 photocatalyst.


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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2017 

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Footnotes

Contributing Editor: Xiaobo Chen

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