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An energy-based method for analyzing instrumented spherical indentation experiments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

Wangyang Ni
Affiliation:
Materials and Processes Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, Michigan 48090, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824
Yang-Tse Cheng
Affiliation:
Materials and Processes Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, Michigan 48090
Che-Min Cheng
Affiliation:
Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, People’s Republic of China
David S. Grummon
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824
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Abstract

Using dimensional analysis and finite element calculation, we studied spherical indentation in elastic–plastic solids with work hardening. We report two previously unknown relationships between hardness, reduced modulus, indentation depth, indenter radius, and work of indentation. These relationships, together with the relationship between initial unloading stiffness and reduced modulus, provide an energy-based method for determining contact area, reduced modulus, and hardness of materials from instrumented spherical indentation measurements. This method also provides a means for calibrating the effective radius of imperfectly shaped spherical indenters. Finally, the method is applied to the analysis of instrumented spherical indentation experiments on copper, aluminum, tungsten, and fused silica.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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