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An efficient single-mode Nd3+ fiber laser prepared by the sol-gel method

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

Fengqing Wu
Affiliation:
Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855-0909
David Machewirth
Affiliation:
Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855-0909
Elias Snitzer
Affiliation:
Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855-0909
George H. Sigel Jr.
Affiliation:
Fiber Optic Materials Research Program, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855-0909
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Abstract

High quality Nd-doped single-mode fibers have been prepared by using a sol-gel process. The longest fluorescence lifetime measured was 520 μs in an Al: SiO2 glass fiber containing 0.47 wt.% neodymium oxide. An efficient neodymium fiber laser with a slope above threshold of 42% was successfully demonstrated with the sol-gel prepared Nd-doped single-mode fibers as a fiber laser oscillator.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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References

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An efficient single-mode Nd3+ fiber laser prepared by the sol-gel method
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