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Sentences in discourse: an analysis of a discourse by Bertrand Russell

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 November 2008

Carlota S. Smith
Affiliation:
The University of Texas at Austin

Extract

In this paper I present a stylistic analysis of a short discourse by Bertrand Russell. My purpose is twofold: first, to suggest an approach to syntactically based stylistic analysis that goes beyond mere frequency counts, and, second, to draw out some linguistic ramifications of the approach.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1971

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