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Brent Berlin and Paul Kay, Basic color terms: their universality and evolution. Berkeley and Los Angeles: The University of California Press, 1969. Pp. xi + 178.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 November 2008

W. R. Merrifield
Affiliation:
Summer Institute of Linguistics, Mitla, Oaxaca, México

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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1971

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References

REFERENCES

Berlin, B. (1970). A universalist–evolutionary approach in ethnographic semantics. In A. Fischer (ed.), Current directions in anthropology. Bulletins of the American Anthropological Association, Vol. 3, No. 3, Part 2, 318.Google Scholar
Gleason, H. A. Jr., (1961). An introduction to descriptive linguistics. New York: Holt, Rinchart & Winston. (Rev. ed., 1966.)Google Scholar
Goodenough, W. H. (1965). Yankee kinship terminology; a problem in componential analysis. In E. A. Hammel (ed.), Formai semantic analysis. Special Publication of the American Anthropological Association, Vol. 67, No. 5, Part 2, 259287.Google Scholar
Jakobson, R. & Halle, M. (1956). Fundamentals of language. The Hague: Mouton.Google Scholar
Lenneberg, E. H. & Roberts, J. M. (1956). The language of experience: a study in methodology. Memoir 13 of IJAL.Google Scholar
Longacre, R. E. (1956). Review of W. M. Urban, Language and reality: the philosophy of language and the principles af symbolism; and of B. L. Whorf, Four Articles on metalinguistics. Lg 32. 298308.Google Scholar
Nida, E. A. (1959). Principles of translation as exemplified by Bible translating. In Brower, R. A. (ed.), On translation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, pp. 1131. [Reprinted in The Bible Translator 10. 148–164 (1959).]Google Scholar
Merrifield, W. R. (1966). Linguistic clues for the reconstruction of Chinantec prehistory. In Pompa y Pompa, A. (ed.), Summa Anthropologica en homenaje a Roberto y. Weitlaner. México, D. F., 579596.Google Scholar
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Brent Berlin and Paul Kay, Basic color terms: their universality and evolution. Berkeley and Los Angeles: The University of California Press, 1969. Pp. xi + 178.
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Brent Berlin and Paul Kay, Basic color terms: their universality and evolution. Berkeley and Los Angeles: The University of California Press, 1969. Pp. xi + 178.
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Brent Berlin and Paul Kay, Basic color terms: their universality and evolution. Berkeley and Los Angeles: The University of California Press, 1969. Pp. xi + 178.
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