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Head mirror versus headlight: illumination, visual identification and visual acuity for otolaryngological examination

  • C-H Lin (a1), H-T Hsu (a1), P-Y Chen (a2), L K Huon (a3), Y-Z Lin (a1) and S-H Hung (a1)...

Abstract

Objective:

To investigate and compare the performance of head mirrors and headlights during otolaryngological examination.

Methods:

The illuminance and illumination field of each device were measured and compared. Visual identification and visual acuity were also measured, in 13 medical students and 10 otolaryngology specialists.

Results:

The illuminance (mean ± standard deviation) of the LumiView, Kimscope 1 W and Kimscope 3 W headlights and a standard head mirror were 352.3 ± 9, 92.3 ± 4.5, 438 ± 15.7 and 68.3 ± 1.2 lux, respectively. The illumination field of the head mirror (mean ± standard deviation) was 348 ± 29.8 grids, significantly greater than that of the Kimscope 3 W headlight (183 ± 9.2 grids) (p = 0.0017). The student group showed no statistically significant difference between visual identification with the best headlight and the head mirror (score means ± standard deviations: 56.2 ± 9 and 53.3 ± 14.1, respectively; p = 0.3). The expert group scored significantly higher for visual identification with head mirrors versus headlights (59.7 ± 3.3 vs 55.2 ± 5.8, respectively; p = 0.0035), but showed no difference for visual acuity.

Conclusion:

Despite the advantages of headlight illumination, head mirrors provided better, shadow-free illumination. Despite no differences amongst students, head mirrors performed better than headlights in experienced hands.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: Dr Shih-Han Hung, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St, Sinyi District, Taipei City 110, Taiwan Fax: +886 2 27359903 E-mail: seedturtle@gmail.com

References

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Keywords

Head mirror versus headlight: illumination, visual identification and visual acuity for otolaryngological examination

  • C-H Lin (a1), H-T Hsu (a1), P-Y Chen (a2), L K Huon (a3), Y-Z Lin (a1) and S-H Hung (a1)...

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