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Objective assessment of learning curves for the Voxel-Man TempoSurg temporal bone surgery computer simulator

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 May 2012

R Nash
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, UK
R Sykes
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, UK
A Majithia
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, UK
A Arora
Affiliation:
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, St. Mary's Hospital, Imperial Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
A Singh
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, UK
S Khemani
Affiliation:
Department of ENT, Surrey and Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust, Surrey, UK
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Introduction:

Simulators are becoming an increasingly important part of surgical training. Temporal bone surgery is one area in which simulators, such as the Voxel-Man TempoSurg simulator, are likely to play a significant role in training. We present learning curve data from novice trainees using this simulator to learn cortical mastoidectomy, exposure of the sigmoid sinus, and exposure of the short process of the incus.

Methods:

We measured the time taken to perform the procedures, the volume of reference bone removed, and the structures damaged during dissection.

Results:

We found improvement in a number of parameters over the course of the study. The overall scores, structural damage scores and time taken improved, to differing degrees, for each task. The volume of reference bone removed remained constant.

Conclusion:

These results indicate that the trainees' efficiency improved as they became more proficient at removing a given volume of reference bone.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2012

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References

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