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Second-order wave diffraction by a vertical cylinder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2006

F. P. Chau
Affiliation:
Department of Naval Architecture and Offshore Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
R. Eatock Taylor
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ, UK

Abstract

The main difficulty in second-order diffraction analysis stems from the contribution of the second-order potential, which obeys an inhomogeneous free-surface boundary condition. In some applications it is sufficient to know the second-order hydro-dynamic force, which can be calculated without explicitly evaluating this second-order potential. This technique cannot however be used for calculating other quantities such as the hydrodynamic pressure at any point, the sectional force and bending moment in the cylinder or the free-surface elevation due to the second-order effects. This paper provides a detailed analysis of the second-order diffraction problem of a uniform vertical circular cylinder in regular waves. This furnishes results not only on the cylinder surface, but also on the free surface, and in principle in the fluid domain surrounding the body. The analysis may help to throw some light on the physical interpretation of the second-order theory and its mathematical description. Moreover, this information is intended to complement the development of general numerical methods for arbitrary bodies.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1992 Cambridge University Press

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References

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