Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-jp8mt Total loading time: 0.249 Render date: 2022-12-02T14:43:23.296Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

The mediation effect of anthropometry and physical fitness on the relationship between birthweight and basal metabolic rate in children

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 November 2019

Isabele Goes Nobre
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Rhône-Alpes (CRNH-RA), Lyon, France Centre Européen pour la Nutrition et la Santé (CENS), Lyon, France
Marcos Andre Moura-dos-Santos
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Education, Superior School of Physical Education, University of Pernambuco, Brazil
Gabriela Goes Nobre
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Education and Sports Science, Centro Acadêmico de Vitoria–Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil
Ravi Marinho dos Santos
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Education and Sports Science, Centro Acadêmico de Vitoria–Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil
Isabella da Costa Ribeiro
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil
Gabriela Carvalho Jurema Santos
Affiliation:
Department of Physical Education, Superior School of Physical Education, University of Pernambuco, Brazil
Eveline Viana da Silva da Fonseca
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil
Tafnes Laís P. Santos de Oliveira
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil
Wylla Tatiana Ferreira e Silva
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil
Julie-Anne Nazare
Affiliation:
Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Rhône-Alpes (CRNH-RA), Lyon, France Université-Lyon, CarMeN Laboratory, INSERM 1060, INRA 1397, Université Claude Bernard Lyon1, INSA Lyon, Oullins, France
Carol Gois Leandro*
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil
*
Address for correspondence: Carol Gois Leandro, Departamento de Nutrição – Centro Academico de Vitória – UFPE; Rua Alto do Reservatório, s/n Bela Vista. Vitória de Santo Antao, Pernambuco, Brazil. Email. carolleandro22@gmail.com

Abstract

Background:

Birthweight (BW) has been associated with anthropometry, body composition and physical fitness during growth and development of children. However, less is known about the mediation effect of those variables on the relationship between BW and basal metabolic rate (BMR) in children.

Objective:

To analyse the mediation effect of anthropometry, body composition and physical fitness on the association between BW and BMR in children.

Methods:

In total, 499 children (254 boys, 245 girls) aged 7–10 years were included. Anthropometry (weight, height, head, waist and hip circumferences), body composition (skinfolds thickness, body fat percentage), physical fitness (handgrip strength, flexibility, muscular endurance, muscular explosive power, agility, running speed) and BMR were evaluated. The analyses were conducted by: single-mediator analysis (SMA) and multi-mediator analysis (MMA).

Results:

The SMA indicates height, head, waist and hip circumferences and handgrip strength as significant mediators of BW on BMR for boys and height, hip circumference and handgrip strength as significant mediators of BW on BMR for girls. In MMA for girls, there were significant indirect effects for height, hip circumference and handgrip strength, with 79.08% of percent mediation. For boys, the head and waist circumferences mediation had a significant indirect effect, with 83.37% of percent mediation.

Conclusion:

The anthropometric variables associated with BW were body height, head, hip and waist circumferences for boys and body height and hip circumference for girls. The current study provides new evidence that height and handgrip strength during childhood mediated the relationship between BW and BMR.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Eriksson, J, Forsen, T, Tuomilehto, J, Osmond, C, Barker, D. Size at birth, fat-free mass and resting metabolic rate in adult life. Horm Metab Res. 2002; 34, 7276.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zhang, Z, Kris-Etherton, PM, Hartman, TJ. Birth weight and risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in US children and adolescents: 10 year results from NHANES. Matern Child Health J. 2014; 18, 14231432.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
de Onis, M, Garza, C, Onyango, AW, Rolland-Cachera, MF. le Comite de nutrition de la Societe francaise de p. [WHO growth standards for infants and young children]. Arch Pediatr. 2009; 16, 4753.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moura-Dos-Santos, M, Wellington-Barros, J, Brito-Almeida, M, Manhaes-de-Castro, R, Maia, J, Gois Leandro, C. Permanent deficits in handgrip strength and running speed performance in low birth weight children. Am J Hum Biol. 2013; 25, 5862.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moura-Dos-Santos, MA, De Almeida, MB, Manhaes-De-Castro, R, Katzmarzyk, PT, Maia, JA, Leandro, CG. Birthweight, body composition, and motor performance in 7- to 10-year-old children. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2015; 57, 470475.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nuyt, AM, Alexander, BT. Developmental programming and hypertension. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2009; 18, 144152.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tchamo, ME, Moura-Dos-Santos, MA, Dos Santos, FK, Prista, A, Leandro, CG. Deficits in anthropometric indices of nutritional status and motor performance among low birth weight children from Maputo City, Mozambique. Am J Hum Biol. 2017; 29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lamb, MM, Dabelea, D, Yin, X, et al. Early-life predictors of higher body mass index in healthy children. Ann Nutr Metab. 2010; 56, 1622.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gao, X, Yan, Y, Xiang, S, et al. The mutual effect of pre-pregnancy body mass index, waist circumference and gestational weight gain on obesity-related adverse pregnancy outcomes: a birth cohort study. PloS one. 2017; 12, e0177418.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lazzer, S, Patrizi, A, De Col, A, Saezza, A, Sartorio, A. Prediction of basal metabolic rate in obese children and adolescents considering pubertal stages and anthropometric characteristics or body composition. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014; 68, 695699.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Raaijmakers, A, Jacobs, L, Rayyan, M, et al. Catch-up growth in the first two years of life in Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW) infants is associated with lower body fat in young adolescence. PloS one. 2017; 12, e0173349.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heymsfield, SB, Chirachariyavej, T, Rhyu, IJ, Roongpisuthipong, C, Heo, M, Pietrobelli, A. Differences between brain mass and body weight scaling to height: potential mechanism of reduced mass-specific resting energy expenditure of taller adults. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2009; 106, 4048.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lazzer, S, Bedogni, G, Lafortuna, CL, et al. Relationship between basal metabolic rate, gender, age, and body composition in 8,780 white obese subjects. Obesity. 2010; 18, 7178.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Luciano, A, Bolognani, M, Rossi, F, Suzuki, Y, Zoppi, G. [Basal metabolism and respiratory quotient in obese children]. Pediatr Med Chir. 1998; 20, 399403.Google ScholarPubMed
Sandboge, S, Moltchanova, E, Blomstedt, PA, et al. Birth-weight and resting metabolic rate in adulthood - sex-specific differences. Ann Med. 2012; 44, 296303.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Suikkanen, J, Matinolli, HM, Eriksson, JG, et al. Early postnatal nutrition after preterm birth and cardiometabolic risk factors in young adulthood. PloS one. 2018; 13, e0209404.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Muller, MJ, Langemann, D, Gehrke, I, et al. Effect of constitution on mass of individual organs and their association with metabolic rate in humans--a detailed view on allometric scaling. PloS one. 2011; 6, e22732.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Paiva, M, Souza, TO, Canon, F, et al. Stunting delays maturation of triceps surae mechanical properties and motor performance in prepubertal children. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2012; 112, 40534061.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ridgway, CL, Brage, S, Anderssen, SA, Sardinha, LB, Andersen, LB, Ekelund, U. Do physical activity and aerobic fitness moderate the association between birth weight and metabolic risk in youth?: the European Youth Heart Study. Diabetes Care. 2011; 34, 187192.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dos Santos, FK, Moura Dos Santos, MA, Almeida, MB, et al. Biological and behavioral correlates of body weight status among rural Northeast Brazilian schoolchildren. Am J Hum Biol. 2018; 30, e23096.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dulloo, AG, Jacquet, J, Miles-Chan, JL, Schutz, Y. Passive and active roles of fat-free mass in the control of energy intake and body composition regulation. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017; 71, 353357.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lohman, TG, Going, SB. Body composition assessment for development of an international growth standard for preadolescent and adolescent children. Food Nutr Bull. 2006; 27, S314S325.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Meredith, MD, Welk, GJ, Fitnessgram & Activitygram. Test Administration Manual-Updated, 4th edn, 2007. The Cooper Institute.Google Scholar
EUROFIT. Handbook for the EUROFIT tests of physical fitness, 1988. Council of Europe Committee for the Development of Sport, Rome, Italy.Google Scholar
FAO/WHO/UNU. Human energy requirements: report of a joint FAO/WHO/UNU expert consultation, 2004. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy.Google Scholar
Hayes, A. Introduction to mediation, moderation, and conditional process analysis. a regression-based approach, 2013; pp. 1609182308. Guilford, New York.Google Scholar
Preacher, KJ, Kelley, K. Effect size measures for mediation models: quantitative strategies for communicating indirect effects. Psychol Methods. 2011; 16, 93115.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nitzl, C, Roldan, JL, Cepeda, G. Mediation analysis in partial least squares path modeling: Helping researchers discuss more sophisticated models. Ind Manage Data Syst. 2016; 116, 18491864.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacKinnon, DP, Krull, JL, Lockwood, CM. Equivalence of the mediation, confounding and suppression effect. Prev Sci. 2000; 1, 173181.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sachdev, HS, Fall, CH, Osmond, C, et al. Anthropometric indicators of body composition in young adults: relation to size at birth and serial measurements of body mass index in childhood in the New Delhi birth cohort. The Am J Clin Nutr. 2005; 82, 456466.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gomes, TN, Katzmarzyk, PT, dos Santos, FK, Souza, M, Pereira, S, Maia, JA. Overweight and obesity in Portuguese children: prevalence and correlates. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014; 11, 1139811417.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Matinolli, HM, Hovi, P, Levalahti, E, et al. Neonatal nutrition predicts energy balance in young adults born preterm at very low birth weight. Nutrients. 2017; 24, 912.Google Scholar
Matinolli, HM, Hovi, P, Mannisto, S, et al. Early protein intake is associated with body composition and resting energy expenditure in young adults born with very low birth weight. J Nutr. 2015; 145, 20842091.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Joint, F. Energy and protein requirements: report of a joint FAO/WHO/UNU expert consultation, 1985. World Health Organization.Google Scholar
Wren, RE, Blume, H, Mazariegos, M, Solomons, N, Alvarez, JO, Goran, MI. Body composition, resting metabolic rate, and energy requirements of short-and normal-stature, low-income Guatemalan children. Am J Clin Nutr. 1997; 66, 406412.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heymsfield, SB, Pietrobelli, A. Body size and human energy requirements: reduced mass-specific total energy expenditure in tall adults. Am J Hum Biol. 2010; 22, 301309.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Treit, S, Zhou, D, Chudley, AE, et al. Relationships between head circumference, brain volume and cognition in children with prenatal alcohol exposure. PloS one. 2016; 11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Javed, F, He, Q, Davidson, LE, et al. Brain and high metabolic rate organ mass: contributions to resting energy expenditure beyond fat-free mass. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010; 91, 907912.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nielsen, S, Hensrud, DD, Romanski, S, Levine, JA, Burguera, B, Jensen, MD. Body composition and resting energy expenditure in humans: role of fat, fat-free mass and extracellular fluid. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000; 24, 11531157.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beunen, G, Ostyn, M, Simons, J, et al. Development and tracking in fitness components: Leuven longtudinal study on lifestyle, fitness and health. Int J Sports Med. 1997; 18, S171S178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Byrne, HK, Wilmore, JH. The relationship of mode and intensity of training on resting metabolic rate in women. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2001; 11, 114.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Harding, JE. The nutritional basis of the fetal origins of adult disease. Int J Epidemiol. 2001; 30, 1523.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Aiello, LC, Wheeler, P. The expensive-tissue hypothesis: the brain and the digestive system in human and primate evolution. Curr Anthropol. 1995; 36, 199221.Google Scholar
Navarrete, A, van Schaik, CP, Isler, K. Energetics and the evolution of human brain size. Nature. 2011; 480, 9193.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Aiello, LC, Wells, JCK. Energetics and the evolution of the genus HOMO. Annu Rev Anthropol. 2002; 31, 323338.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
O’Rourke, HP, MacKinnon, DP. Reasons for testing mediation in the absence of an intervention effect: a research imperative in prevention and intervention research. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2018; 79, 171181.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The mediation effect of anthropometry and physical fitness on the relationship between birthweight and basal metabolic rate in children
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The mediation effect of anthropometry and physical fitness on the relationship between birthweight and basal metabolic rate in children
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The mediation effect of anthropometry and physical fitness on the relationship between birthweight and basal metabolic rate in children
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *