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607. Winter feeding of dairy cows: I. The influence of level and source of protein and of the level of energy in the feed on milk yield and composition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

W. Holmes
Affiliation:
The Hannah Dairy Research Institute, Kirkhill, Ayr
R. Waite
Affiliation:
The Hannah Dairy Research Institute, Kirkhill, Ayr
D. S. MacLusky
Affiliation:
The Hannah Dairy Research Institute, Kirkhill, Ayr
J. N. Watson
Affiliation:
The Hannah Dairy Research Institute, Kirkhill, Ayr

Extract

1. The effect of feeding levels of protein and energy appreciably higher than the Woodman standards on the yield and composition of the milk from twelve Ayrshire cows has been studied in two winter-feeding experiments.

2. In the first experiment the S.E. of the concentrate ration was held constant at 63½% and the D.C.P. content adjusted to 10, 15 and 17%. The 10 and 15% D.C.P. concentrates derived their protein from home-grown feedingstuffs, whereas the 17% D.C.P. concentrate was a bought-in commercial mixture. Feeding the three levels of D.C.P. led to no statistically significant differences in milk yield, milk composition or live-weight gain, although the commercial mixture (17% D.C.P.) resulted in milk with a slightly lower fat content.

3. The second experiment reversed the feeding conditions of the first, i.e. D.C.P. was held constant at 16% and three concentrates were fed which contained 59, 67 and 75% S.E. respectively. The two rations of higher S.E. content gave significantly more milk than the low S.E. ration and tended to give slight increases in live weight. There was a slight increase in the S.N.F. content of the milk when the S.E. of the concentrate was raised from 59 to 67% S.E. This was due almost entirely to an increase in the protein content of the milk. There was no further increase in S.N.F. with the 75% S.E. concentrate, and this latter concentrate produced milk with a slightly lower fat content.

4. Comparison of costs and returns showed that the cheap low protein concentrate, ration C, even though it gave the least milk, yielded the highest profit. It was shown, however, that at any reasonable fixed cost of starch equivalent the most profitable level of feeding above the Woodman maintenance standard was 3–3·3 lb. S.E./10 lb. of milk of 3·8–4·0% fat. Alternatively, the total ration should be 110–117% of the Woodman standard.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Proprietors of Journal of Dairy Research 1956

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References

(1)Yates, F., Boyd, D. A. & Pettitt, G. H. N. (1942). J. agric. Sci. 32, 428.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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607. Winter feeding of dairy cows: I. The influence of level and source of protein and of the level of energy in the feed on milk yield and composition
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