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Promoting interdisciplinary research to respond to public health crises: The response of the Columbia University CTSA to the opioid crisis

  • Jennifer L. Humensky (a1) (a2), Zainab Abedin (a1), Kawthar Muhammad (a1), Michelle McClave (a1), Tiara Torres (a1), Elisabeth Swift DiMaria (a1), Muredach P. Reilly (a1) (a3) and Harold Alan Pincus (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

Effectively addressing public health crises requires dynamic and nimble interdisciplinary collaborations across the translational spectrum, from bench to clinic to community. The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Program hubs are uniquely suited to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations across universities and academic medical centers. This paper describes the activities at the Columbia University CTSA Program hub to address a current public health crisis, the opioid epidemic. Columbia’s CTSA Program hub led a three-phase approach, based on the Conceptual Model of Transdisciplinary Scientific Collaboration as described by Stokols et al.: (1) a university-wide planning and brainstorming phase to identify key leaders across many domains who are influential in addressing the opioid epidemic, (2) a campus-wide and community outreach to identify all interested parties, and (3) ongoing targeted support for collaboration development. Preliminary metrics of success are interdisciplinary collaborations and grant funding. We describe recent examples of how interdisciplinary collaboration, academic-community partnership, and pilot funding contributed to the development and funding of innovative interdisciplinary research, including the New York site of the HEALing Communities initiative. The processes are now being used to support interdisciplinary approaches for other translational public health issues.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: J. L. Humensky, PhD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Health Policy and Management (in Psychiatry), Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Dr, Unit 100, Room 2704, New York, NY 10032, USA. Email: Jennifer.Humensky@nyspi.columbia.edu

References

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Keywords

Promoting interdisciplinary research to respond to public health crises: The response of the Columbia University CTSA to the opioid crisis

  • Jennifer L. Humensky (a1) (a2), Zainab Abedin (a1), Kawthar Muhammad (a1), Michelle McClave (a1), Tiara Torres (a1), Elisabeth Swift DiMaria (a1), Muredach P. Reilly (a1) (a3) and Harold Alan Pincus (a1) (a2)...

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